Summer Reading Lists - Allie Levy

Hanover is so lucky to have Allie Levy in town. Allie gave us a little behind-the-scenes tour at Still North Books & Bar, and we can assure you, it’s going to be a fabulous space to gather this fall. In the meantime, we have Allie’s summer reading list for you. We love how Allie gives a nod to rereading old favorites. Don’t forget: you can still play Summer Reading Bingo to win a Still North tote! Thank you, Allie!

 
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I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump this summer. Despite the popularly held opinion that summers are for relaxing by a body of water, it often feels like the least relaxing time of year up here. The extra daylight hours and warm weather create a kind of mania—squeeze as much work and play into the summer months or risk devastating regret come September. With so much to do, my reading time and brainpower have been limited, and I’ve gained a new appreciation for rereading. As such, I give you my favorite books of the summer—a few new or new to me, and some I’ve been happy to revisit.

The Dog Stars, by Peter Heller

A gorgeously written, contemplative post-apocalyptic adventure story. Peter Heller began his career as an outdoor journalist, and his background shines through in his depictions of the natural world. Dog Stars is the first of Heller’s now four novels. Think Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, but more hopeful in its devastation.

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone, by Lori Gottlieb

It says a lot that Maybe You Should Talk to Someone was published in April and I’ve already begun a second reading. In it, therapist/writer Lori Gottlieb demystifies the therapeutic process by sharing the journeys of several of her patients (fictionalized to protect patient confidentiality), as well as her own experience on both sides of the couch. Part memoir, part self-help, part exploration of the mechanisms through which therapy works, Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is a book for anyone who is currently in therapy, has thought about therapy, or would never even consider going to therapy.

Parable of the Sower, by Octavia Butler

Originally published 25 years ago, Octavia Butler’s story about a teenage girl who physically feels the pain of others is set in a near-future dystopia. Society has fallen into utter chaos, and the preceding circumstances have many uncomfortable similarities to our current predicament. Tackling climate change, racial violence, retrograde politics, and religion in one fell swoop, Parable of the Sower is the kind of novel that proves the importance of fiction.

Normal People, by Sally Rooney

Reading Normal People, in some ways, felt to me like re-reading Irish author Sally Rooney’s first, excellent novel Conversations with Friends—in a good way. Once again, Rooney deftly deals with the emotional landscapes of a young couple and the concentric circles of relationships surrounding them. Rooney has an uncanny ability to distill complex emotions and self-contradictory behaviors into crystalline sentences. In Normal People, she follows one couple from their high school almost-romance through their days at Trinity College. An unputdownable romance with substance.

The Body Artist, by Don DeLillo

When it comes to the number of times I’ve read a book, The Body Artist may be second only to the third Harry Potter. An intimate portrait of the ways in which we grieve, DeLillo’s novella tells the story of a performance artist coping with her husband’s suicide. As the grief sets in, her reality begins to fragment. The Body Artist is short and strange, alienating yet familiar.

Summer Reading Lists - Becky Karush

We just discovered Becky Karush’s very fun READ TO ME podcast earlier this summer and we really love the concept: each episode features Becky reading from a different book and then talking about what she loves in the book. She also discusses the Gateless Writing method (which she practices and teaches), and takes listener feedback. Becky is a warm and engaging host, and obviously a lover of books. We were so happy when she agreed to share a summer reading list with us. Thank you, Becky!

p.s. Becky has also asked us to suggest a book for her podcast, so we hope we can soon share a link to the episode where she discusses our choice.

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On READ TO ME, the podcast to listen to what we love, I read short excerpts from all kinds of writing and talk about what I love. It’s a kind of fun and pleasure with the page that predates jobs and school. These four books (plus one) have been or will be featured episodes. They are each a delight.

 
 

Sonny’s Blues, by James Baldwin

The narrator is a schoolteacher in Harlem. His brother, Sonny, is a jazz pianist just out of jail. This long short-story from 1957 tracks their childhood, the grueling forces grinding down their neighborhood, and the limits of family love. The sentences are pristine, and the last scene breaks open my tired, distracted heart, as it cracked and taught me when I first read it as a teenager.

Figuring, by Maria Popova

I love a writer who shoots for the moon. Maria Popova goes for the biggest questions—what is success, what is love, what is a meaningful life—and she answers them with a set of entwined, literary biographies of extremely cool people. I never thought I’d have a passion to read Elizabeth Barrett Browning, or learn about astronomer Maria Mitchell. Now I do. The opening chapter is dizzying and gutsy.

An American Marriage, by Tayari Jones

There is a scene in the middle of Tayari Jones’ novel where the entire architecture of the story shifts around you. It’s like being in the middle of a sentient house rebuilding itself! My whole body hummed in that scene, and that was after an earlier scene made me put down the book and cry in the bath with sadness and relief. (I did not put the book in the bath.) The craft is a masterclass, and the story is vast.

The Summer Fletcher Greel Loved Me, by Suzanne Kingsbury

I use a writing method called Gateless Writing, founded by Suzanne Kingsbury. She published this book, her debut, in 2004. It’s set in a little, rough Mississippi town that’s so hot, the sentences melt across the page. Her control of rhythm seduces me. The way she shows characters in their bodies amazes me. The way she preserves love in the worst of human ugliness saves me. It’s a steamy, unafraid book.

Girl Waits with Gun, by Amy Stewart

My son, who is 7, sometimes asks what I’m reading. When he heard about this one, he wanted to know every bit of the plot. I understand why: the idea of a tall, awkward woman sitting in the dead of night outside the farmhouse she doesn’t love with a revolver to protect her family from mobsters is fascinating. Stewart did a ton of research to get the details of early 20th century New York and New Jersey right. But the research doesn’t overwhelm. It serves Constance Kopp and her sisters, and their grumpy, funny triumph.

Summer Reading Lists - Ben Cosgrove

Ben Cosgrove is an amazing composer, musician, and writer. As you might know, we’re big fans of all he does. After he performed at our very first event, the Mud Season Salon, we quickly found out that we share similar taste in books. We love these recommendations that Ben shared in his summer reading list and hope you do too.

p.s. We’ll be announcing a special project with Ben soon. Stay tuned!


Horizon, by Barry Lopez

Barry Lopez has long been one of America's finest and most well-respected living nature writers —Of Wolves and Men was a finalist for the National Book Award in 1978 and the peerlessly wonderful Arctic Dreams won it in 1986 -- and Horizon reads like a sort of capstone to a long career spent poking around the corners of the world, thinking hard about what they are like and how they are connected. Its sweeping, dreamlike narrative follows him nonlinearly across time and space, and we catch versions of Lopez in Africa, Australia, Antarctica, South America at a variety of different ages and stations. Its concerns are ultimately not just ecological but philosophical: what is the relationship between time, place, and experience, particularly in a wounded world?

Normal People, by Sally Rooney

Different friends of mine kept recommending this book to me for months, and I finally got my hands on a copy in June. I loved reading it. Rooney's writing isn't soaring or fancy; rather, it articulates with needle-precision the confusing and complicated internal dynamics of the sometimes-romantic-sometimes-not relationship between the novel's two main characters, a boy and a girl from a small village in western Ireland whose friendship grows, shifts, and readjusts as they head off to Dublin for university and then beyond. Her eye for detail is unbelievable, and lends a shattering realness to the novel. I thought it was wrenching and lovely, and frankly, as a fellow millennial, I felt extremely gratified to read about these people and their Byzantine, tortuous romance/nonromance.

Underland, by Robert Macfarlane

Macfarlane writes thoughtfully and beautifully about the natural world, but is especially remarkable for the special attention he pays to how people engage with it. Previous books of his have considered the language we use to talk about the landscape, or described the experience of traveling long distances on foot. His latest project, Underland, is a thrilling and often dark foray into the fictional and actual spaces beneath the ground, and winds up a thoughtful consideration not only of how humans tend to interact with the underground, but of Earth's journey through all-but-unimaginable expanses of time.

The Weather Machine, by Andrew Blum

Andrew Blum's last book, Tubes, was a detailed exploration of the physical structure of the Internet, and similarly, this follow-up is an engaging examination of the machines and methodologies undergirding our surprisingly detailed understanding of how weather works and where and when it will happen. As with Tubes, Blum is able to lend light and humanity to a story about infrastructure, and he elegantly traces the process by which a vast system of models and careful measurements have literally enabled us to predict the future.

The Overstory, by Richard Powers

Powers's most recent novel, the winner of this year's Pulitzer Prize in Literature, tells a sprawling, powerful story about people and trees. It moves an enormous cast of characters through an staggeringly vast timeline, but its narrative momentum never weakens and it grapples meaningfully with the fundamental alienation precipitating human civilization's coming existential crisis along the way. Few books have reoriented my literal view of the world as thoroughly as this one: I have actually found that I look up more often now.

The Favourite Game, by Leonard Cohen

This is Leonard Cohen's first novel (he wrote two), and it was published in the early 1960s, several years before its author found a career as a folk singer. Its lyrical narrative centers around the adventures of an extremely Cohenlike protagonist named Breavman, who ambles around Montreal wracked with internal torment and all but consumed by a broad set of spiritual, existential, artistic, and sexual concerns. Cohen's original Canadian publisher rejected the manuscript outright after finding it "tedious, egotistical, disgusting, and morbid in its preoccupation with sex," and the English house with which he finally placed it required that he cut it in half, but the result is a beautifully written coming of age story and an introspective, uncomfortably honest rendering of what it's like to be an anxious young man trying his best to figure out just how one ought to be in the world.

Summer Reading Lists - Angela Evancie

Continuing down the path of asking our favorite podcasters for their summer reading lists, we knew we must ask Angela Evancie, the host of Vermont Public Radio’s Brave Little State. If you want to learn more about the great state of Vermont, this podcast is a must-listen. Vermonters across the state ask questions and the Brave Little State team digs in to search for the answers. It’s thoughtful and often fascinating look at topics from old growth forests, to issues of race in Vermont to Vermont’s aging hippies. Don’t miss the episode What Draws So Many Writers and Poets to Vermont? Thank you so much, Angela, for sharing your summer reading list with us!

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I work with sound for a living, and as a result do a lot of listening in my free time. Less so in the summer. Come June weekends, I try to recapture the experience I had as a graduate student at the Bread Loaf School of English, in Ripton: me, an Adirondack chair in the shade of a maple, no cell service, and selection of books just fetched from the library. “[W]hat a morning — fresh as if issued to children on a beach,” Virginia Woolf wrote, and that is exactly what a stack of summer reading feels like.

The Story of a New Name, by Elena Ferrante

Halfway through the first installment of Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels, My Brilliant Friend, I concluded that the exalting blurbs were hyperbole. By the time I finished the book, I was in a panicked state, so invested in the lives and the piercing friendship of Lenù and Lila that I had my bookstore special order this, the second book in the series, the very next day. It’s even better than the first, and now I’m on to the third.

Warlight, by Michael Ondaatje

My friend Xander needed to talk about this book with someone, so I picked it up and immediately got lost in it. A narrator, Nathaniel, tries to decipher the odd turns in his childhood in post-war England, after his parents leave his sister and him in the care of a cohort of mysterious drifters. An exquisite rendering of the pain of not knowing, and the canals and switchbacks of memory.

Amy Foster, by Joseph Conrad

A migrant bound for America is shipwrecked, and washes up in a provincial English village that has little tolerance for foreigners. First locked in a shed, and then shunned for singing in his native language, the man Yanko is cast away many times over. Joseph Conrad wrote this short story in 1901, but it demands to be read as a modern parable.

The Far Away Brothers, by Lauren Markham

Also on the theme of migration—this time contemporary, as we follow the epic journey of twin brothers who migrate from El Salvador to California—Lauren Markham’s book is a work of nonfiction that comes to life like the most addictive novels. It’s also the most exacting and sensitive reporting I’ve read on this issue.

Pachinko, by Min Jin Lee

A story that traces the shifting fortunes of four generations of an ethnic Korean family, and one that taught this reader a great deal about Korea and Japan’s intertwined history. Min Jin Lee comes forth with so many deeply feeling, fully formed characters — even minor ones, who appear late in the novel — that you get the sense she can’t help herself.

Outline, by Rachel Cusk

The prose in this book glitters with sunlight off the Mediterranean. A woman travels to Greece to teach a writing class, and falls into a series of very random and strangely engrossing conversations with strangers. “What is it about life?” I was left wondering.

Interview: Miciah Bay Gault

We’re so excited to share our interview with Miciah Bay Gault on the occasion of today’s release of her debut novel, Goodnight Stranger. Goodnight Stranger is a beautifully written novel, a literary thriller that will have you wondering from the start who is telling the truth and who is hiding secrets. Set on an island, it’s the perfect summer escapism novel, perfect to take with you to the beach, but equally satisfying if you’re holidaying on your sofa after a long week of work.

Of Goodnight Stranger, George Saunders says, “Somewhere the ghosts of Shirley Jackson and the Henry James of The Turn of the Screw are smiling, because a wildly talented young writer has joined their lineage. What a taut, keenly intelligent, and provocative debut Goodnight Stranger is.”

Thank you so much, Miciah, for answering our questions so thoughtfully. We’re so happy your book is out in the world!

Miciah teaches in the MFA in Writing & Publishing program at Vermont College of Fine Arts and coordinates the Vermont Book Award. She’ll be celebrating her book’s at launch Bear Pond Books this evening (July 30), and will be reading at several Northern New England locations in the coming months, including Gibson’s Bookstore (August 1), Northshire Books (August 10), The Galaxy Bookshop (August 27), Phoenix Bookstore (September 19), and Vermont College of Fine Arts (September 27).


Literary North: We’re always curious how a story begins and how it changes. Did the story in Goodnight Stranger begin with a specific image or idea? How did you find the plot changing as you wrote? Did anything unexpected arise?

Miciah Bay Gault: I read a personal history in The New Yorker years ago—about one couple’s struggle with infertility, which has nothing in the world to do with Goodnight Stranger. In The New Yorker piece the couple kept losing the pregnancies, over and over. They ended up, after years of hope and heartache, with one daughter, and I found myself wondering about the daughter. Did she, as she got older, think about the brothers and sisters she might have had, did she feel a sense of grief, was she haunted by them?

Then I imagined this image: two grown siblings in a doorway, a stranger facing them across the threshold. The air is charged with surprise, with recognition, hope, and danger. One of the siblings says, “It’s him.”

That premise was the starting point. I knew early on that Lydia and Lucas would by the siblings, twins actually, that they’d be in their late 20s, that their lives would be overshadowed by the death of a third sibling in infancy. I knew a stranger was going to show up, someone handsome and charismatic, and also eerily familiar with their home, their family. From there I had to ask myself all kinds of hard questions to find out what the book was really about.

LN: Let’s talk about your writing process. Do you write a messy first draft or do you tend to go sentence by sentence? How many drafts did you go through while writing this book? Are you the type of writer who works at the same time and place every day, or did you have to grab time whenever and wherever you could?

MBG: I’m laughing as I answer this question. I’m pretty sure I wrote 70 or 80 drafts of this novel over fifteen years. Some drafts were major renovations, removing entire characters, and shuffling chapters from one location to another. Some drafts were more concerned with tightening language. I love sentences and spend an inordinate amount of time working on that level, polishing, carving, chiseling.

I’ve been so lucky to have an agent, Jenni Ferrari-Adler of Union Literary, who’s very hands on and who worked on several drafts with me. And my editor Laura Brown at Park Row Books/ HarperCollins, has an amazing editorial eye. After so many years of working alone on the manuscript, it’s been a dream to have a team working with me on the book.

I prefer to write in the morning, riding that first wave of caffeine. I’m very fond of coffee. Sometimes I still manage to write at this time, if my kids sleep in a little, but mostly I write when I can—when the kids are in school, or napping. When I was working full time at Vermont College of Fine Arts, I wrote during lunch breaks, or first thing in the morning on the picnic tables on the college green.

LN: The character Cole is an outsider. He arrives on the island and then insinuates himself into the lives of Lydia and others who grew up on the island. Can you talk a bit about the role of the outsider in your story?

MBG: Writers love to quote John Gardner (although I’ve never actually found the original quote) that there are only two plot variations in fiction: a man goes on a journey, or a stranger comes to town. Obviously, in Goodnight Stranger, I was interested in the latter. I knew I wanted Lydia and Lucas to have a safe, prescribed life, routines that were interrupted by the arrival of the stranger. I wanted Lydia to see herself through the stranger’s eyes. In many ways Goodnight Stranger is the story of siblings who, so mired in grief and longing for the past, never grew up. They’re frozen in time, in a kind of adolescent limbo. Lydia realizes at one point that they’ve never moved the furniture around in their house, never replaced wine glasses that broke decades ago. Baby B is the sibling who died in infancy almost thirty years ago, and his bedroom is still set up for a baby, with teddy bear knobs on the dresser. Cole, the stranger, challenges all their beliefs, everything they thought was true about their family, and ultimately…unsticks time for Lydia and Lucas.

LN: Have you always been an avid fan of literary suspense? Can you share some of your favorite authors—past or present—in the genre?

MBG: I wouldn’t actually say that I’m a fan of literary suspense, and to be honest I’m more than a little surprised that I ended up writing a literary thriller!

I do like page-turners, but that term can be subjective. I consider Pride and Prejudice a page-turner (and I know how it ends because I’ve read it a dozen times!). That said, I’m a devoted fan of Shirley Jackson, whose sentences are exquisite, and whose horror is rich and intricate. Another favorite author is Wilkie Collins, who I would classify as literary suspense.

I respond to books with beautiful sentences and a strong emotional core, and sometimes those books happen to be literary thrillers. Fiction I’ve loved lately include Donna Tartt’s A Secret History, Crystal Hana Kim’s If You Leave Me, Melanie Finn’s The Underneath, and Carmen Maria Machado’s Her Body and Other Parties.

LN: What was the most memorable thing you read in the past month?

MBG: I’m riveted by Christina Thompson’s Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia, a nonfiction exploration of how people came to inhabit the Polynesian islands. It’s beautifully written, impeccably structured, and fascinating.

 
Photo by Daryl Burtnett

Photo by Daryl Burtnett