Upper Valley

The Dipper - June 2019

"The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know

 

June News

Rena Mosteirin

Rena Mosteirin

Dan Chiasson

Dan Chiasson

GennaRose Nethercott

GennaRose Nethercott

Drumroll, please….!

It’s finally time to announce the featured poets for Poetry & Pie III. We are beyond thrilled that Rena J. Mosteirin, Dan Chiasson, and GennaRose Nethercott will be joining us at Sweetland Farm in Norwich, Vermont, on Saturday, August 3, from 3:00 to 5:00 pm.

Poet-for-hire Taylor Mardis Katz is returning with her Remington typewriter so that she can write custom poems for you. As in past years, we welcome you to read your own, original work at our open mic. New to Poetry & Pie this year, we’ll have a musical interlude by one of our favorite local musicians, Laura Jean Binkley (who also performed at last November’s Writers’ Process Night). And, of course, we’ll ply you with every kind of pie—sweet, savory, gluten-free, vegan—that you can imagine. Get the details and RSVP on our Poetry & Pie page. We look forward to seeing you there!

Rena Mosteirin, a Poetry & Pie featured poet, is also the author of the first Little Dipper, our new handmade chapbook series. Rena’s chapbook, tentatively titled half-fabulous whales, is a collection of erasure poems crafted from the pages of Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick. We’re producing a limited edition of 25, numbered and signed, and will have them for sale at Poetry & Pie. If you’d like to reserve a copy in advance, let us know!

Our friend Ocean Vuong’s debut novel, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous, comes out on June 4, and we couldn’t be more excited. You might remember that Ocean was one of the featured poets at last year’s Poetry & Pie, where he read an excerpt from the novel. On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous has received rave reviews—including starred reviews from Kirkus, Library Journal and Booklist—and is the number one Indie Next pick for June. You have a few opportunities to see him in New England in June and he’s going to be at Bookstock in Woodstock, Vermont, at the end of July. Not only is his writing amazing, but he’s a wonderful reader of his own work. Not to be missed!

In case you missed it, we have some new goodies on our blog, including a Friday Reads selection by writer Sierra Dickey, and an interview with local writer, Rachel Barenbaum about her debut novel, A Bend in the Stars.

 
 

Slow Club Book Clubbers are leisurely making their way through our spring selection, Wioletta Greg’s Swallowing Mercury. If you’re not a member yet, you can read our recent, mid-season check-in letter about that book, and you can sign up to be notified about our summer book, which we’ll announce very soon.

 
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And finally… we recently changed our website from .com to .org. We’ve always imagined ourselves more as a community organization than a business, and we want our website to reflect that. The old website address will automatically take you to the new one for the time being, but, when you get a chance, please update your bookmarks to the new address: www.literarynorth.org.

June’s Shooting Stars

A cool literary find from each of us to help light up your month!

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  • I recently discovered a new favorite podcast, Everything Else, a culture podcast from the Financial Times. My favorite episode is “Ways of Seeing: Sheila Heti on Pierre Bonnard, but there are so many good ones. Richard Grant, Alexander Chee, Kerry James Marshall, Sally Rooney. Give it a listen! —Shari

  • If you have a spare ~24 minutes in our day, listen to Mary Ruefle read her essay “My Private Property” on KCRW’s Bookworm podcast. Every time I listen, it leaves me speechless. —Rebecca


June Highlights

Shomari Wills

Shomari Wills

Brooklyn journalist and author Shomari Wills reads from his book, Black Fortunes, in the historic Barn House at the Clemmons Family Farm in Charlotte, Vermont, on Saturday, June 1, from 4:00 to 6:00 pm.

If you haven’t had a chance yet to see James Crews talk about his book, Healing the Divide, he will be at Northshire Bookstore in Manchester Center, Vermont, along with Julia Shipley, Todd Davis, Carol Cone, Alice Gilburn, David Axelrod, and Michelle Wiegers on Sunday, June 2, at 2:00 pm.

Helen Macdonald

Helen Macdonald

The Bread Loaf Environmental Writers’ Conference and Translator’s Conferences offer many readings open to the public from Friday, May 31 through Wednesday, June 5 at Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont. Some of our favorite writers will be on hand, including Megan Mayhew Bergman, Claire Vaye Watkins, Dan Chiasson, J. Drew Lanham, Helen Macdonald, Emily Wilson and more.

The Thing in the Spring—an annual festival of music, art, and literature in Peterborough, New Hampshire—features readings by Mary Ruefle and Arielle Greenberg on Friday, June 7; Adar Cohen, Doug Valentine, and Ed Symkus on Saturday, June 8; and Iliana Rocha and Rage Hezekiah on Sunday, June 9. All readings take place at the Toadstool Bookshop. Check our calendar for reading times.

The Joan Hutton Landis Summer Reading Series kicks off on Sunday, June 9, at 5:30 pm with Angela Palm and Nathan McClean. The series takes place at Big Town Gallery in Rochester, Vermont, and continues through September 1.

Amitava Kumar. Photo by Snigdha Kumar

Amitava Kumar. Photo by Snigdha Kumar

Amitava Kumar, author of Immigrant, Montana, is reading at Northshire Bookstore in Manchester Center, Vermont, on Thursday, June 13, at 5:30 pm.

Sunday, June 16 is Bloomsday, the day we commemorate the life of James Joyce and his novel Ulysses. If you’re in the Upper Valley, you can celebrate with a brunch, readings, and discussion with professor James Heffernan at Jesse’s Restaurant in Hanover, New Hampshire, starting at 11:30 am. $32 per person. Registration is required.

The 2019 Hyla Brook Reading Series continues in Derry, New Hampshire, on Friday, June 14, at 7:00 pm with keynote speaker Bruce Bennett and Frost Farm Prize winner, David Southward.

David Huddle and Gregory Spatz read from their latest works of fiction at The Vermont Bookshop in Middlebury, Vermont, on Thursday, June 20, at 7:00 pm.

Zinzi Clemmons. Photo by Nina Subin

Zinzi Clemmons. Photo by Nina Subin

Cheryl Strayed will speak at the Latchis Theater in Brattleboro, Vermont, on Tuesday, June 25, at 7:30 pm in celebration of Brattleboro Area Hospice’s 40th anniversary.

On Friday, June 28, Zinzi Clemmons will read from her debut novel, What We Lose, at the Norman Williams Public Library in Woodstock, Vermont. The reading begins at 4:30 pm.

This year’s Justice - And Poetry - For All, put together by the Sundog Poetry Center, will focus on the poetry of immigrants. As of press time, the date and lineup haven’t been announced, but Sundog’s website says it’s happening in June. Check their website for updates.

Visit our calendar for detailed information about these events and more!

 

Worth a Drive

  • Yaddo presents Amy Hempel at Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs, New York, on June 6, at 6:00 pm. Reservations are required. She will be in conversation with Elaine Richardson, President of Yaddo.

  • Robert MacFarlane, author of Underland, will be in conversation with Sebastien Smee at Harvard Book Store in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on June 11, at 7:00 pm.

  • Regina Porter will be reading from her debut novel, The Travelers, at the Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, Massachusetts on June 20, at 7:00 pm.

  • The Juniper Summer Writing Institute hosts public readings during the month of June. Readers include Joy Williams, Ross Gay, Ocean Vuong, Mitch Jackson, CA Conrad, and more!

 

Worth a Listen

  • Check out last month’s Brave Little State from VPR, where they looked into just what draws so many writers and poets to Vermont.

  • Pam Houston on the OtherppL podcast.

  • Preti Taneja joins Andy Miller and John Mitchinson on the Backlisted podcast to discuss Beloved, by Toni Morrison.

 

We're Looking Forward to These June Releases

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Calls For Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

Frost Farm Poetry Conference
Accepting registrations for this year’s conference (June 14 to 16). Registration includes workshops, a one-on-one meeting with your instructor, keynote with Bruce Bennett, critiques with poet-in-residence Rhina Espaillat, panel discussions, readings, a reception, breakfasts and lunches.
Deadline: June 1 | Details

Juniper Summer Writing Institute
Accepting applications for this summer’s institute (June 16 to 22). The institute includes manuscript consultations, craft sessions, workshops, readings, and other events, led by a wide range of instructors, including CAConrad, Gabriel Bump, Ross Gay, Khadijah Queen, Bianca Stone, Ocean Vuong, Dara Weir, and Joy Williams.
Deadline: rolling admissions until full | Details

The Frost Place 2019 Conference on Poetry
Spend a week at “intensive poetry camp” (July 6 to 12) with writers who are deeply committed to learning more about the craft of writing poetry. The Frost Place Conference on Poetry offers daily workshops, classes, lectures, writing and revising time in a supportive and dynamic environment. $25 application fee.
Deadline: June 15 | Details

Vermont Studio Center Fellowships
Twenty-five VSC fellowships open to all artists and writers living and working anywhere in the world, in addition to six special fellowships for writers. These awards are for residencies scheduled between September 2019 and May 2020. Every VSC residency opportunity includes private room, private studio space, all meals, and full access to their schedule of evening programs and events. $25 application fee.
Deadline: June 15 | Details

Zig Zag Lit Mag
Accepting fiction, non-fiction, dramatic forms, poetry—any genre, any topic. To submit you must live, labor, or loiter in Addison County, Vermont.
Deadline: June 30 | Details

Green Mountain Writers Conference
For five days each summer (July 29 to August 2), people who have been coming to the conference for years and first-timers joyously tackle the job of putting words together to tell story, to craft poetry, to communicate, to share, and to learn from one another under the close tutelage of published authors. Faculty this year includes Dede Cummings, Jensen Beach, Yvonne Daley, and Gary Margolis.
Deadline: Call (802) 236-6133 for availability or email the director, Yvonne Daley, at yvonnedaley@me.com | Details

The Frost Place Poetry Seminar
Join a select community of poets for 5-1/2 days (August 4 to 10) to refresh your artistic inspiration in a setting of great natural beauty. Have your poems-in-progress given generous and focused attention in this intimate setting. The seminar offers unparalleled access to a faculty of celebrated contemporary poets. The goal is to send you home charged up to re-enter your own work. $25 application fee.
Deadline: July 1 | Details

Hunger Mountain Issue 24: Patterns
General submissions are open in prose and poetry on the theme of patterns. Work must not have been published before, including online.
Deadline: October 15 | Details

Lifelines Magazine
Accepting submissions of original and unpublished short stories, nonfiction, poetry, and artwork for their 2020 issue. While they consider a broad spectrum of subject matter for publication, they are looking for pieces that speak to the experience of medicine in some way.
Deadline: October 31 | Details

Center for Cartoon Studies, MFA Degree and Certificate Programs
Now accepting applications for the MFA, One- and Two-year Certificate programs, Low Residency second-year option. Learn all you need to know about making comics, self-publishing, in a prolific and dynamic environment and community. $50 application fee.
Deadline: rolling admissions until programs are filled | Details


Upcoming Workshops and Classes

Helping the Poet Make a Better Poem with Steven Cramer
Saturday, June 8, 1:00 to 4:00 pm

In this three-hour workshop, we’ll honor both the critical and creative faculties of our brains (perhaps discovering that they’re closer siblings than we might have thought). We’ll first discuss work-in-process by participants, asking ourselves the only question worth asking in a workshop: how might we help the poet make this poem the best it can be? Then we’ll engage in one or two writing “experiments” designed to encourage using language more as paint than as a vehicle for conveying information, favoring the sensory over making sense.
Location: The Ford House, SNHU, Manchester, New Hampshire | Cost: $65-$85 | Details

Elements of the Novel Workshop with Eileen Charbonneau
Saturday June 8, 15, 22, and 29, 11:00 am to 1:00 pm
Do you think you have a novel in you?  Have you written one (or more!) and want to make it better and closer to publication? Eileen will cover topics such as setting, characterization, voice and dialogue. All are encouraged to write during class and learn how to critique each other and self-edit.
Location: Village Square Booksellers | Cost: $5 per session | Details

New Hampshire Writers’ Project Write-In
Saturday, June 22, 9:00 am to 3:00 pm

The NHWP holds seasonal Write-Ins for its members where they can come and hang out with fellow writers and have a dedicated time to write. We write all day, break for a social lunch, and then get back to writing or take part in an optional ad hoc critique session with fellow writers.
Location: The Ford House, SNHU, Manchester, New Hampshire | Cost: free for members | Details

Do I Have a Book in Me? with Bill Schubart
Tuesday, June 25, 7:00 pm

As an author or eight fictional works—both self-published and traditionally published—Bill will answer questions about the work of writing and the new business of publishing. Bill will also discuss his recently published novel, The Priest.
Location: Phoenix Books, Burlington, Vermont | Cost: free | Details

Tapping into Your Write Brain: A Workshop for the Creatively Inclined with Joni Cole
Friday, June 28, 6 to 7:30 pm
In this workshop, you will participate in a creative writing exercise using thematic prompts that stir up…who knows? And that’s the fun, freeing, and always powerful experience of writing and sharing from a “prompt”. No writing experience is required. Space is limited. Please register by June 21 through the Hood Museum of Art’s website.
Location: Hood Museum of Art, Hanover, New Hampshire | Cost: free | Details

Write Here, Write Now with Barbara Steiner
Saturday, June 29, 9:30 am to 4:30 pm
Beginning and experienced writers are invited to a day-long creative writing workshop at Aryaloka Buddhist Center. Based on the Amherst Writers and Artists method, we’ll write in response to prompts (which you are free to ignore) designed to help us bypass our inner critic and write from what comes to us.
Location: Newmarket, New Hampshire | Cost: $45-$85 | Details

Interview: Jo Knowles and Tillie Walden

The Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont, is hosting a fantastic workshop this summer: Creating Graphic Novels for the YA Market. The workshop will take place from July 30 to August 3 and features authors Jo Knowles and Tillie Walden.

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Jo Knowles is the author of seven books for young adults. She teaches in the MFA program at Southern New Hampshire University and lives in Vermont. Tillie Walden is a cartoonist and illustrator from Austin, Texas. Her graphic memoir, Spinning, is a Lambda Literary Award finalist.

We asked Jo and Tillie to tell us more about the workshop, their writing lives, and the world of YA and graphic novels.


Literary North: How did the idea for this workshop come about? How did the two of you meet? Had you worked together before you led your first Cartoon Studies workshop last summer?

Tillie Walden

Tillie Walden

Tillie Walden: Jo and I met, and this feels so funny in retrospect, because I was struggling with my book Spinning. I asked James Sturm, the co-director of the Center for Cartoon Studies, to point me towards a writer who could help me with the plot of my memoir. And he suggested Jo! Jo and I met a few times and she completely saved me. With the work we did I got going and went off and made my book.

As far as how the workshop itself came to be, I believe it was an idea thought up at the school that was then brought to me and Jo. I was of course ecstatic about the idea! And last summer was the first time we worked together, and it felt so natural. Jo and I make a great team, if I do say so myself.

Jo Knowles: When I met Tillie to help with her memoir, I was immediately struck by the heart and beauty in her work. What a joy to work with such a talented new artist. When James asked if I'd like to co-teach a workshop with Tillie, I was thrilled! As soon as we started brainstorming how we'd set up the class, I could tell we were going to have a blast because we worked so easily together, even just in the planning stages. 

LN: Can you tell us a bit about how the workshop works? Do participants come in with a story they want to work on, or do they generate ideas as part of the workshop process?

TW: It's a week-long workshop and it covers a lot of topics. When you think about creating young adult graphic novels, there's a lot of pieces that go into it. There's writing, there's drawing, there's plotting, there's marketing, etc. So the students who come end up working on all of these aspects. A few came with a specific idea for a story and the class assignments worked with that, but others came simply wanting to learn about making comics. The class size is small enough, though, that it still works well even when the students come from different backgrounds or motivations.

JK: Yes, I think it works both for students who have no idea what they want to do, and for students who have a specific project in mind. We try to shape the exercises in such a way that they can be adapted to whatever the artist is inspired to work on in the moment. We tend to focus more on a specific craft elements, such as character, dialogue, or setting, so it really doesn't matter what stage in the process the artist is at, or whether a beginner or more advanced. In fact, the more variety, the better.

LN: You both come from slightly different literary backgrounds, one as a writer of fiction and the other as a cartoonist. How do your backgrounds complement each other when teaching this workshop?

TW: I think our different backgrounds really made the workshop work. It’s great to have a balance between the writing and drawing aspect of comics, and teaching alongside each other gives the students a really great perspective. Often comics classes tend to be skewed in either direction—more to the drawing side, or more to the writing. I love that when Jo and I teach together we can offer a class that really gives you insight into both.

Jo Knowles

Jo Knowles

JK: What Tillie said! I think our strengths complemented each other quite well, especially during feedback time. Tillie offers really helpful suggestions on approaching art and panel set up, and I help more with plot, world building, character development, and things like that. I don't really have the technical vocabulary for comics (yet), but I can critique how effectively the art tells a story, and it works out in a really interesting way.

LN: Some people don't take graphic novels or comics seriously, but some of the most moving books we've read are graphic novels, including books like Maus and Fun Home. What's special about the graphic novel format in terms of how it can address difficult themes?

TW: I think graphic novels can address difficult themes precisely because they are visual. They really create quite a sense of empathy. Readers can really identify with the story because it's playing out right in front of them. People who don't take comics seriously are very much behind the curve.

JK: And they are missing out on some of the most gorgeous stories (not just visually) of our time. We need to stop thinking about word-count and grade levels when we recommend books to students and think more about well-told, powerful stories, whatever the format. I don't know why so many adults seem to stop valuing art in literature when their kids stop reading picture books.

LN: What are your favorite graphic novels?

TW: I love This One Summer by Mariko and Jillian Tamaki, and I also love Stitches by David Small. Those are two of my favorites! Oh, also Buddha by Osamu Tezuka. So so good.

JK: Tillie took my favorites! But I'll add El Deafo by Cece Bell, and anything by Gene Luen-Yang. Of course, I also love Tillie's Spinning!

LN: Are you working on any new writing projects now?

TW: I'm working on a book that I can't talk about yet, BUT, I have a new book coming out this fall. It's the print edition of my LGBT space-themed webcomic, On a Sunbeam.

JK: I have a new middle grade novel coming out next year with Candlewick Press called Where the Heart Is, which I'm very excited about. I'm currently playing around with a picture book idea (a first for me!) as well as a younger middle grade novel that features the young sister of the main character in Where The Heart Is. Both projects feel super new, so I don't have too much to say about them yet.

LN: What was the most memorable thing you read in the last month?

TW: I recently reread Tuck Everlasting, by Natalie Babbit, which I loved as a kid, and it just captivated me all over again. It's such a beautiful work, and completely memorable.

JK: A friend of mine sent me a Valentine with the poem "Song of the Builders," by Mary Oliver tucked inside. I put it on our refrigerator and have been reading it practically every day. But now I want to go get my very worn, very well-read copy of Tuck Everlasting and read that. Thanks for the reminder, Tillie!

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The Dipper - March 2018

"The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know!

March News

We hope many of you made it out to JAGFest 2.0 last month. Each of the staged readings was wonderful, but it was the accumulated power of the entire weekend—the writing, the performances, the emotions, the discussions, and the feeling of community—that really made the festival special. If you missed the festival this year, you'll get another chance next February!

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Continuing our collaboration with JAG Productions, we're thrilled to announce the Lady Sings the Blues book group. This one-meeting book group will read and discuss Billie Holiday's autobiography, Lady Sings the Blues, in preparation for attending a performance of JAG Productions' presentation of Lady Day at Emerson's Bar & Grill. We'll meet at Yankee Bookshop in Woodstock, Vermont, on Tuesday, May 15, at 7:00 pm. Local author and fantastic question-asker Julia Cooke will lead our discussion. Want to join us? Visit our event page to sign up.

 

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We're kind of blown away by how many of you have already joined our Slow Club Book Club and we hope you enjoyed the first selection as much as we did. We've selected our Spring book and will announce it to members in early March. Not a member yet? It's never too late to join us!

 

Pie

In other big news, we've got most of the details worked out for Poetry & Pie II! Once again we'll be meeting at Sweetland Farm, in Norwich, Vermont, to listen to and read poems, eat pie, and enjoy a perfect summer afternoon. We'll reveal the fantastic lineup of poets soon. In the meantime, circle Saturday, July 21, 3:00 to 5:00 pm, on your calendar. You won't want to miss this.

Finally, we want to take a paragraph here to thank our community, near and far, for supporting Literary North. So many of you have said such kind things about our work, sent us your literary news, met with us to discuss events and venues, encouraged us, volunteered for us, cheered us on, donated to us, and helped make Literary North better. We truly couldn't do this work without you. Thank you!

 

March's Shooting Stars

A cool literary find from each of us to help light up your month!

  • Thanks to the Vermont Humanities Council, I'm finally reading Moby-Dick. And yes, I'm loving it. If you read it long ago and want a refresher, or if you're daunted by reading it at all, I highly recommend listening to Moby Dick Big Read, a project conceived by Plymouth University. Different voices—some famous, some not—read the book to us chapter by chapter. It's wonderful. For a taste, listen to Nigel Williams' terrific reading of Chapter 3: The Spouter-Inn. —Rebecca
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  • Do you know about The Book Jam? Lisa Christie and Lisa Cadow, both of the Upper Valley, have a blog where they pass on book recommendations of all stripes. Their latest blog post features Norwich Bookstore bookseller, Carin Pratt. Carin's recommendations can't be beat. I always look forward to visiting Carin at the bookstore to hear which books she's raving about. —Shari

March Highlights

The Snapdragon Inn in Windsor, Vermont, is hosting author Ruth Porter, granddaughter of Maxwell Perkins, for their first Author's Book Club weekend on Saturday, March 3. Ruth will be leading a book discussion of her latest novel beginning at 3:00 pm. The discussion will be preceded by afternoon tea and followed by a book signing and a wine and cheese tasting.

Victor LaValle

Victor LaValle

On Thursday, March 1, Victor LaValle will be reading as part of the Cleopatra Mathis Poetry & Prose Series at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. The reading will be held at Sanborn Library and begins at 4:30 pm.

AVA Gallery's quarterly live storytelling event, The Mudroom, returns on Thursday, March 15 in Lebanon, New Hampshire. This quarter's theme is "The First Time." Food at 6:30 pm and the storytelling begins at 7.00. Purchase advance tickets online, $7.50 to $10. Ages 21 and over. Get your tickets soon as this event usually sells out!

On Sunday, March 11, Pam Houston will be giving a reading at the Vermont Studio Center in Johnson, Vermont, at 7:00 pm.

Morgan Jerkins

Morgan Jerkins

Morgan Jerkins reads from her critically acclaimed book of essays, This Will Be My Undoing, on Wednesday, March 14, at 7:00 pm at Bennington College.

On Friday, March 16, Dartmouth Professor of History Annelise Orleck will read from and discuss her newest book, We Are All Fast-Food Workers Now, at Water Street Bookstore in Exeter, New Hampshire. The reading begins at 7:00 pm. If you miss this reading, you can also catch Annelise's reading at Phoenix Books in Burlington, Vermont, on Thursday, March 22, at 6:30 pm.

Robin Coste Lewis will be at Bennington College on Wednesday, March 21 as a part of the "Poetry at Bennington" series. Evie Shockley reads on Wednesday, March 28. Both of these readings start at 7:00 pm in Tishman Lecture Hall.

Multi-talented writer Rita Banerjee will read from her debut poetry collection, Echo in Four Beats, on Tuesday, March 27, at 5:30 pm at the New Hampshire Institute of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire.

 

Worth a Drive

Photo by Tom Hines

Photo by Tom Hines

Poet Ocean Vuong—recent winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize—will be reading at the Alumnae House Conference Hall at Smith College, in Northampton, Massachusetts, on Tuesday, March 27. The reading begins at 7:30 pm. Meet you there?!

Amherst College Lit Fest begins Thursday, March 1 and goes through Saturday, March 3. Writers include Carmen Maria Machado, Min Jin Lee, Junot Diaz, and Masha Gessen. Visit Amherst College's website for more information.

 

We're Looking Forward to These March Releases

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Calls For Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

The 2018 Frost Farm Prize for Metrical Poetry is open for entries through March 30. The winner receives $1,000 and an invitation, with honorarium, to read in June 2018 as part of The Hyla Brook Reading Series at the Robert Frost Farm. For more information and to enter, please visit the Frost Farm Prize page.

Applications are open until March 31 for two scholarships at The Frost Place:

  • The Gregory Pardlo Scholarship for Emerging African American Poets is open to African American Poets writing in English who have published up to one book of poetry. The winner will receive a full scholarship to attend the Poetry Seminar, including room and board, and will give a featured reading at the Seminar. For more information, please visit the Gregory Pardlo Scholarship page.
  • The Latin@ Scholarship is open to applicants that self-identify as Latin@, have a strong commitment to the Latin@ community, and are at least 21 years of age. The winner will receive tuition, room and board, and travel for The Frost Place Conference on Poetry. For more information and to apply, please visit the Latin@ Scholarship page.

The Fleming Museum of Art at UVM is seeking original poetry based on the art on view in the museum for their Ekphrastic Poetry Reading (on April 18, at 6:00 pm). Submissions must be received by March 16. For more information, please visit the Fleming Museum's event page.

Vermont Literary Review is taking submissions of creative work about New England until March 31. For more information, please visit Castleton University's website.

The Odyssey Writing Workshop (June 4 to July 13) is accepting applications until April 7. The Odyssey workshop, for writers of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, is held on the campus of Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire. Prospective students must include a 4,000-word writing sample with their application. For more information, please visit the Workshop page.

Registration is open for the VCFA Novel Retreat (May 15 to 21). Faculty includes Connie May FowlerJeff KleinmanRichard McCann, and Crystal Wilkinson. A $200 non-refundable deposit is required. For more information, please visit the Novel Retreat page.

The Bennington Review is open for submissions through May 15 with no reading fee. For more information, please visit the Bennington Review Submissions page.

The New England Review is open for poetry and digital submissions through May 31. For more information, please visit the NER Submissions page.

Registration is open for the 3rd Annual Poetry Festival at the Fine Arts Work Center (August 5 to 10) in Provincetown, Massachusetts. The Festival includes poetry and songwriting workshops. Faculty includes Traci Brimhall, Cornelius Eady, Nick Flynn, Vievee Francis, Ross Gay, Rebecca Gayle Howell, Patty Larkin, and Patrick Rosal. For information on tuition, housing, and registration, please visit the FAWC Festival page.

Registration is open for 603: The Writers' Conference (April 14) on the SNHU campus in Manchester, New Hampshire. The keynote speaker is novelist Richard Russo. The conference includes master classes, workshops, panel discussions, lunch, and a reception. $85 to $135. For more information and to register, please visit the Conference page.

The Summer Writing Intensive at Marlboro College is accepting applications on a rolling basis through July 5. The intensive is open to anyone 18 years or older. Military veterans are particularly encouraged to apply. For more information, please visit the Summer Writing Intensive page.


March Workshops and Classes

Poet Karin Gottshall is leading three Master Classes: "Figuration Smorgasbord: Roll up Your Sleeves and Get Messy with Metaphor," Saturdays, March 3, 10, and 17, from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm at the Burlington Writers Workshop in Burlington, Vermont. Note: These workshops do not need to be taken as a series. For more information and to register, please visit the Workshop page.

On Saturday, March 10, from 12:30 pm to 4:30 pm, the League of Vermont Writers is offering "Sacred Marriage: The Writer and Their Critic," a workshop that will help you understand and explore the relationship between our writer-self and your inner critic. $60 for League members; $80 for non-members. To attend, you must register and pay in full by March 5. For more information and to register, please visit the Gatherings page.

Are you looking for quality feedback on a work-in-progress but have no time for a weekly class? Joni Cole's one-session "Fast Feedback" workshop on Saturday, March 10, provides writers of fiction and creative non-fiction with a quick fox of feedback, instruction, and collective inspiration. The workshop meets from 9:30 to 10:30 am at the Writer's Center in White River Junction, Vermont. The cost is $45. For more information and to register, please visit the Writer's Center Workshops page.

On Monday, March 12, from 7:00 to 8:00 pm, Catherine Deiley is offering an online workshop titled, "Online Tools to Track Your Submissions." Learn to use tools such as Submittable and Duotrope to stay organized and keep your submissions rolling. $10 for New Hampshire Writers' Project members; $25 for non-members. For more information and to register, please visit the NHWP Workshops page.

Also sponsored by the New Hampshire Writers' Project, Tracy Hahn-Burkett, writer and former DC public policy advocate, will be teaching a "Political Writing: Advocacy" workshop. The workshop will be held at The Ford House on the campus of SNHU, on Wednesday, March 14, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. $50 for NHWP members; $75 for non-members. For more information and to register, please visit the NHWP Workshops page.

Join the Vermont Folklife Center for their "Storytelling for Social Change" workshop on Saturday, March 17, from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. This workshop is intended for anyone interested in developing collaborative documentary storytelling skills, including students, community members, and staff members of organizations doing cultural, community, and social-service work. The workshop will be held at the Helen Day Art Center in Stowe, Vermont. Tuition for the day is $95. For more information or to register, please visit the Workshop page.

On Friday, March 23 and Saturday, March 24, join the Vermont Folklife Center for a "Digital Storytelling for Community Engagement and Sustainability" workshop. This two-day workshop, held at Shelburne Farms in Shelburne, Vermont, is a deep dive into tools and techniques for digital storytelling to engage students and communities in sustainability. $250, includes meals and accommodations. A limited number of partial scholarships are available. For more information and to register, please visit the Workshop page.

Join Mimi Schwartz for "Beyond the I: When Memoir Meets History," a workshop that focuses on the ways that personal narrative is enriched by history—be it family legacies, neighborhood landmarks, or the social history that shapes us. Through readings, discussion, and in-class exercises, participants will discover new strategies for writing their life stories in ways that friends, family or strangers will want to read on. The workshop, held on Saturday, March 24, from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, will take place at The Ford House on the campus of SNHU, in Manchester, New Hampshire. $50 for NHWP members; $75 for non-members. For more information and to register, please visit the NHWP Workshops page.

On Sunday, March 25, author and writing coach Annalisa Parent will walk workshop attendees through the elements of a publishable manuscript. Participants will have the opportunity to share their writing andget meaningful feedback. The workshop will be held at the Toadstool Bookshop in Keene, New Hampshire, from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm. For more information and to register, please visit the Event page.

Join poet Hannah Fries on Wednesday, March 28, at Court Street Arts in Haverhill, New Hampshire, for a joyful exploration of what makes a poem leap off the page and into our hearts. Participants will spend part of the day looking at their own favorite poems and other examples, and part of the day using loose, fun exercises to jump start their own writing. $60 for members; $65 for non-members. For more information and to register, please visit the Classes page.

The Dipper - January 2018

"The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know

 

January News

Happy New Year!

2018 has barely begun and it's already shaping up to be a very exciting year for Literary North and our friends. We have a lot of plans and we can't wait to share them all with you. But first we'll let you in on some great events happening in just the first few weeks of the new year.

We hope this fresh year brings you many good things, including good books, good friends, and good health.

—Shari & Rebecca

 

Start Your Year at the Right Pace with the Slow Club Book Club

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As many of you know, we're announcing the Slow Club Book Club* for 2018! Over the course of the coming year, we'll read four books we've chosen to appeal to the quiet and unhurried in us. We'll start reading our first book this month. If this sounds appealing to you, subscribe to our TinyLetter newsletter to find out more and learn the title of our first book. We really hope you'll join us.

*Shout out to Robin MacArthur for our club name!

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Be the first to hear a Reading from Heart Spring Mountain

Speaking of Robin, our first event of 2018 is the celebration of Robin MacArthur's new novel Heart Spring Mountain, which is being released on January 9Join us at the Norwich Bookstore on Wednesday, January 10 at 7:00 pm for her first official reading. We'll be there to celebrate and provide the refreshments. Reservations are strongly recommended, as seating is limited. Please contact the Norwich Bookstore to reserve your seat.

 

Support Emerging African-American Playwrights at JAGFest 2.0

And finally, mark your calendars for JAGFest 2.0, February 9 to 11 at Brigg's Opera House in White River Junction, Vermont! JAGFest is a performing arts festival put on by Jarvis Green's production company, JAG Productions. The festival features new works that celebrate the talents of African-American playwrights and performing artists. 

JAGFest2018

Over the course of three days, JAG will present four staged readings of new works that are written, directed, and performed by Black theatre artists. The weekend-long festival of play readings celebrates and explores diverse, new voices in American theater. Each performance features a post-show conversation with the playwrights, actors, directors and Dartmouth scholars.

Tickets are on sale now. Single tickets are $15 per performance, or buy a weekend pass that includes access to all presentations for $50!

We're huge fans of Jarvis Green and JAG Productions, and are honored to be a sponsor of this incredible festival. We'll be sharing more information with you about the playwrights and their plays in January, so stay tuned!


January Highlights

Lauren Markham

Lauren Markham

Lauren Markham reads from her non-fiction book, The Faraway Brothers, at VCFA in Montpelier, Vermont, on Wednesday, January 3, at 7:00 pm.

Jenny Boully and Jill McCorkle read at Bennington College's Tishman Lecture Hall, in Bennington, Vermont, on Thursday, January 4, at 7:00 pm, as a part of Bennington's Writers Reading series. Other authors in the series include Claire Vaye Watkins, Major Jackson, Stuart Nadler, Clifford Thompson, Alexander Chee, and Allan Gurganus. See our calendar for more details.

Francisco Cantú will be at the New Hampshire Institute of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Sunday, January 7, at 7:00 pm, to read from his upcoming book, The Line Becomes a River.

Francisco Cantú

Francisco Cantú

Jelani Cobb will give a talk on free speech on college campuses at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, on Wednesday, January 10, at 4:30 pm.

Dan Chaon will be reading at the Vermont Studio Center in Johnson, Vermont, on Wednesday, January 24, at 8:00 pm.

Jeffrey Lent will lead a tribute to Howard Frank Mosher at the Norwich Bookstore on Wednesday, January 31, at 7:00 pm. Come out and celebrate Mosher's final book, Points North.

 

Worth a Drive

Fiona Mozley

Fiona Mozley

Fiona Mozley, whose novel, Elmet, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, will be at the Harvard Bookstore, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Tuesday, January 16 with Hallgrimur Helgason. The reading begins at 7:00 pm.

 

 

We're Looking Forward to These January Releases

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Calls For Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

In neighboring Amherst, Massachusetts, applications open on January 1 for the Juniper Summer Writing Institute (July 17 to 24) and the Juniper Institute for Young Writers (July 22 to 29) at the University of Massachusetts. Faculty for the Juniper Summer Writing Institute includes Eileen Myles, Dorothea Lasky, Rickey Laurentiis, Dara Wier, Noy Holland, Mitchell S. Jackson, and Joy Williams. A non-refundable application fee for the Summer Writing Institute is required. There is no application fee for the Young Writers Institute. For more information about both institutes and to apply, please visit the Juniper Summer Writing Institute website.

Applications are currently open until March 31 for two scholarships at The Frost Place:

  • The Gregory Pardlo Scholarship for Emerging African American Poets is open to African American Poets writing in English who have published up to one book of poetry. The winner will receive a full scholarship to attend the Poetry Seminar, including room and board, and will give a featured reading at the Seminar. For more information, please visit the Gregory Pardlo Scholarship page.
  • The Latin@ Scholarship is open to applicants that self-identify as Latin@, have a strong commitment to the Latin@ community, and are at least 21 years of age. The winner will receive tuition, room and board, and travel for The Frost Place Conference on Poetry. For more information and to apply, please visit the Latin@ Scholarship page.

The Frost Place is accepting submissions for its 2018 Chapbook Competition until January 5. The competition is open to any poet writing in English. Entries must be accompanied by a $28 entry fee. For details about submitting your manuscript and more information about the competition, please visit their Competition page.

Also until January 5The Frost Place is accepting applications for the Dartmouth Poet in Residence program, a six-to-eight-week residency in Robert Frost's former farmhouse. The residency is July 1 to August 15, and includes an award of $1,000 from The Frost Place and $1,000 from Dartmouth College. For more information and to apply online, please visit their Residency page.

Applications for the 2018 MacDowell Colony Summer Residency (June 1 to September 30, 2018)  are being accepted through January 15.  A residency consists of exclusive use of a studio, accommodations, and three prepared meals a day for up to eight weeks. For more information, please visit the Application Guidelines page.

Registration is open for the League of Vermont Writers' Winter Program and Annual Business Meeting (June 27). The theme of the meeting is "New Directions, New Journeys: Writing Resources for Vermont Writers" and will be held at Trader Duke's Hotel in South Burlington, Vermont. $45 for members; $55 for non-members. Registration is open until January 24. For more information and to register, please visit the Meeting page.

Hunger Mountain, the literary journal from VCFA, holds four annual contests: The Howard Frank Mosher Short Fiction PrizeThe Hunger Mountain Creative Nonfiction PrizeThe Ruth Stone Poetry Prize, and The Katherine Patterson Prize for Young Adult and Children's Writing. All contests are open to submissions through March 1. For more information, please visit their Contests page.

Vermont Literary Review is taking submissions of creative work about New England until March 31. For more information, please visit Castleton University's website.

Registration is now open for the VCFA Writing Novels for Young People Retreat (March 23 to 25, 2018). Faculty includes Donna GephartNova Ren SumaAmanda MacielMaggie Lehrman, and Sarah Aronson. A $200 deposit is required (refundable if the retreat is able to fill your spot). For more information please visit the Writing Novels for Young People Retreat page.

Registration is also open for the VCFA Novel Retreat (May 15 to 21, 2018). Faculty includes Connie May FowlerJeff KleinmanRichard McCann, and Crystal Wilkinson. A $200 non-refundable deposit is required. For more information, please visit the Novel Retreat page.

The New England Review is open for poetry and digital submissions through May 31. For more information, please visit the NER Submissions page.

The Bennington Review is open for submissions through May 15, 2018 with no reading fee. For more information, please visit the Bennington Review Submissions page.


January Workshops and Classes

Joni Cole leads "Sunday Surges," a four-session, weekly workshop for fiction and creative non-fiction writers. This workshop, which meets Sundays, January 7 to 28, from 4:00 to 6:00 pm, is a great way to generate material, revise with direction, and make solid progress on your prose project. Each meeting provides you with a deadline to assure you are producing consistently. You will be asked to read aloud excerpts from a work-in-progress (three or so double-spaced pages, given time constraints) at each of our meetings. The discussion of these “surges” allows for quality feedback, and fosters teachable moments that benefit every participant in the group. $145 (minimum 4 participants; maximum 6). Preregistration is required. For more information and to register, email jonibethcole@gmail.com.

Join science fiction author and 2014 NH Flash Fiction winner Ed Ting for an hour-long “Introduction to Flash Fiction” webinar on Tuesday, January 9. This webinar will take a peek at what Flash Fiction is, how you can get started writing it, and how to craft elements to make your story work. You will walk away with the tools you need to tell your three-minute story. Then, when you have your story written, join your writing peers at one of the 2018 Three-Minute Flash Fiction competitions held statewide. $10 for NHWP members, $25 for nonmembers. The event is nonrefundable. For more information and to register, please visit the New Hampshire Writer's Project Workshops page.

Poet James Crews will lead a two-week, online workshop titled "Mindfulness and Writing" from Sunday, January 14 to Sunday, January 28. Examine connections between the practice of meditation/mindfulness and the act of writing fearlessly from the heart. Using quotes and other written works as prompts, we will complete several exercises each week that invite us to pay closer attention to ourselves, our lives, and the world around us as we do our best to define the term, "mindfulness," and what it means for each of us. Beginners and all skill levels are welcome. You do not need any previous experience with mindfulness, meditation or online courses; all you need is a reliable internet connection and an open mind. The cost is $95. For more information and to register, please visit the event page at the Northshire Bookstore website.

Join Vermont poet laureate Chard deNiord for a Poetry Master Class on Monday, January 8, from 6:30 to 8:00 pm at the Burlington Writers Workshop in Burlington, Vermont. This workshop will focus on reading and writing poems whose speakers place another before them, and then make charged figurative connections to what Walt Whitman called “the other I am.” We will read each other’s poems line by line, examining line breaks, poetic strategy, form, intention, imagery, tropes, verbal music, and what John Keats described in his definition of “negative capability” as the ability to “exist in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason.” In addition to writing poems with transpersonal speakers, we will also write a few persona poems as class exercises. For more information and to RSVP, please visit the Burlington Writers Workshop Meetup page.

On Monday, January 22, from 6:30 to 8:00 pm, join poet Gary Margolis for a Poetry Master Class at the Burlington Writers Workshop in Burlington, Vermont. This workshop will reflect on the poetic line by looking at examples, including those we'll write in this workshop. Workshop participants should bring three original poems to this class. We'll also write new ones during the workshop. For more information and to RSVP, please visit the Burlington Writers Workshop Meetup page.

The Dipper - December 2017

"The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know

 

December News

We wish everyone a wonderful holiday season.

To show our gratitude for the support you've given Literary North, we are having four giveaways this month just for newsletter subscribers. We thought it would be nice to revisit our first event of 2017, the Mud Season Salon, by giving away a poetry chapbook by Taylor Mardis Katz; the CD Salt by Ben Cosgrove; Half Wild, a book of short stories, by Robin MacArthur; and The Family, a nonfiction book by Jeff Sharlet. We'll draw names on December 15th. Good luck!

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Salt.jpg
TheFamily.jpg

 

Save the Date: January 10, 2018
Heart Spring Mountain Launch Celebration!

We're partnering with the Norwich Bookstore to help launch Robin MacArthur's fabulous new novel, Heart Spring Mountain, on Wednesday, January 10, at 7:00 pm at the Norwich Bookstore. We'll be there to celebrate and provide refreshments. We hope you'll join us!


December Highlights

Join the Portsmouth Poet Laureate Program for "The Hoot," their monthly poetry reading and open mic, on Wednesday, December 6, at 7:00 pm (doors open at 6:00). This month's featured poets are Gigi Thibodeau and Ben Berman.

Alexander Chee

Alexander Chee

Alexander Chee and Porochista Khakpour will be reading at the Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier, Vermont, on Thursday, December 8, at 5:30 pm.

On Wednesday, December 13, at 7:00 pm, folks will be gathering at the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum in St. Johnsbury, Vermont, to celebrate the publication of Collected Poems, by Galway Kinnell. There will be refreshments and multiple readers of his work.

Anne Fadiman

Anne Fadiman

The Mudroom, live storytelling at the AVA Gallery in Lebanon, New Hampshire, presents this quarter's theme, "Guilty Pleasure," on Thursday, December 14, starting at 6:30 pm. Refreshments will be available. Advance tickets are available online for $7.50 to $10. Tickets at the door are $20.

Anne Fadiman will be at the Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont, reading from her new memoir, The Wine Lover's Daughter, on Friday, December 15, at 7:00 pm.

 

Recommendations for Winter Reading & Listening

Recommended by Shari:

Recommended by Rebecca:

  • Mandible, an essay by Doireann Ní Ghríofa, with music by Linda Buckley
  • Emily Wilson's brilliant new translation of Homer's The Odyssey
  • Any episode of VPR's Brave Little State podcast
  • In the winter, I love reading about polar exploration. If you're like me, and you haven't yet read Apsley Cherry-Garrard's The Worst Journey in the World, do it now. You can get it for free for your epub reader courtesy of Project Gutenberg. 
  • Or follow an Antarctic expedition as it happens by sledging over to Ben Saunder's blog, where he's posting daily updates as he attempts the first solo, unsupported, unassisted crossing of the continent.

 

We're Looking Forward to These December Releases

CollectedPoems.jpg

Calls For Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

The Neukom Institute for Computational Science at Dartmouth College has announced the 2018 Neukom Institute Literary Arts Awards, each with a $5000 honorarium: The Neukom Institute Literary Arts Award for Speculative FictionThe Neukom Institute Literary Arts Award for Debut Speculative Fiction, and The Neukom Institute Literary Arts Award for Playwriting. Any work published no earlier than June 1, 2015 is eligible. The deadline for submission is December 31, 2017. For more information, please visit the Neukom Awards website.

Applications are now open for two scholarships at The Frost Place:

  • The Gregory Pardlo Scholarship for Emerging African American Poets is open to African American Poets writing in English who have published up to one book of poetry. The winner will receive a full scholarship to attend the Poetry Seminar, including room and board, and will give a featured reading at the Seminar. For more information, please visit the Gregory Pardlo Scholarship page.
  • The Latin@ Scholarship is open to applicants that self-identify as Latin@, have a strong commitment to the Latin@ community, and are at least 21 years of age. The winner will receive tuition, room and board, and travel for The Frost Place Conference on Poetry. For more information and to apply, please visit the Latin@ Scholarship page.

The Frost Place is accepting submissions for its 2018 Chapbook Competition until January 5, 2018. The competition is open to any poet writing in English. Entries must be accompanied by a $28 entry fee. For details about submitting your manuscript and more information about the competition, please visit their Competition page.

Also until January 5, 2018, The Frost Place is accepting applications for the Dartmouth Poet in Residence program, a six-to-eight-week residency in Robert Frost's former farmhouse. The residency is July 1 to August 15, and includes an award of $1,000 from The Frost Place and $1,000 from Dartmouth College. For more information and to apply online, please visit their Residency page.

Applications for the 2018 MacDowell Colony Summer Residency (June 1 to September 30, 2018)  are being accepted through January 15, 2018.  A residency consists of exclusive use of a studio, accommodations, and three prepared meals a day for up to eight weeks. For more information, please visit the Application Guidelines page.

Hunger Mountain, the literary journal from VCFA, holds four annual contests: The Howard Frank Mosher Short Fiction Prize, The Hunger Mountain Creative Nonfiction Prize, The Ruth Stone Poetry Prize, and The Katherine Patterson Prize for Young Adult and Children's Writing. All contests are open to submissions through March 1, 2018. For more information, please visit their Contests page.

Vermont Literary Review is taking submissions of creative work about New England until March 31, 2018. For more information, please visit Castleton University's website.

Registration is now open for the VCFA Writing Novels for Young People Retreat (March 23 to 25, 2018). Faculty includes Donna Gephart, Nova Ren Suma, Amanda Maciel, Maggie Lehrman, and Sarah Aronson. A $200 deposit is required (refundable if the retreat is able to fill your spot). For more information please visit the Writing Novels for Young People Retreat page.

Registration is also open for the VCFA Novel Retreat (May 15 to 21, 2018). Faculty includes Connie May Fowler, Jeff Kleinman, Richard McCann, and Crystal Wilkinson. A $200 non-refundable deposit is required. For more information, please visit the Novel Retreat page.

The New England Review is open for Poetry and digital submissions through May 31, 2018. For more information, please visit the NER Submissions page.