Heart Spring Mountain

The Dipper - November 2018

"The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know

 

November News

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Want to hear some gorgeous music, listen to two fabulous authors read, take part in a conversation about the writing process, and stuff your face with homemade biscuits? Well then, look no further than our own Writers’ Process Night happening this Saturday, November 3 at Open Door in White River Junction, Vermont.

Join us, Laura Jean Binkley, Camille Guthrie, and Peter Orner, and a mountain of biscuits made by Literary North’s favorite baker and all-around fan, Dr. Hermann Puterschein. Scurry over to the Event page now and claim your seat at the biscuit bar! See you on Saturday!

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Slow Club Book Club members, have you started reading our final book of 2018 yet? If not, please don’t worry; you’re in fantastic company! At least one of your SCBC hosts hasn’t started either. And guess what? That’s just fine. October always seems to be a month when everything hits the fan at once. Between finally waking up from the summer drowsies and suddenly realizing that the end of the year crazies are nigh, this time of year is often overstuffed with deadlines, new projects, school meetings, and making appointments to get winter tires put on. Never fear… Sara Maitland’s A Book of Silence will wait patiently for you to dip in as you have time, maybe while waiting for those tires to be changed.

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It always feels a bit awkward to promote one’s own stuff, but if you can’t do it in your own newsletter, where can you? So this is just to say… Rebecca has written a science book about rivers for kids aged 7 to 10, and it's coming out later this month! Rivers and Streams! is part of a set of four “Explore Waterways” books published by the excellent Nomad Press in White River Junction, Vermont. It’s packed with really fun illustrations by the very talented Tom Casteel, and it includes 25 river-related activities. If you have a young person in your life who’s into science—or even one who isn’t yet into science—check out the set, or the many other wonderful non-fiction books for kids that Nomad publishes.

November’s Shooting Stars

A cool literary find from each of us to help light up your month!

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  • Tommy Orange’s review of Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah in The New York Times was fantastic. Here’s a snippet:

“Now more than ever I believe fiction can change minds, build empathy by asking readers to walk in others’ shoes, and thereby contribute to real change. In “Friday Black,” Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah has written a powerful and important and strange and beautiful collection of stories meant to be read right now, at the end of this year, as we inch ever closer to what feels like an inevitable phenomenal catastrophe or some other kind of radical change, for better or for worse. And when you can’t believe what’s happening in reality, there is no better time to suspend your disbelief and read and trust in a work of fiction—in what it can do.”

—Shari

  • I’m in a bit of a glum mood, what with the current dreary weather and the state of the world and all, so Emily Dickinson’s Patreon page in The New Yorker is giving me a welcome lift as I put the finishing touches on this newsletter. I’ll be scraping my shekels together to afford patronage at $100 a month (“I will tell you which parts of the Bible would be made better with bees. Plus all previous rewards.”) How about you? —Rebecca


November Highlights

On Friday, November 2, at 7:30 pm, GunSense Vermont, the Unitarian Church of Montpelier, and Bear Pond Books present “Bullets Into Bells: Poets and Citizens Respond to Gun Violence.” This event features Major Jackson, Matthew Olzmann, and Kerrin McCadden and takes place at the Unitarian Church in Montpelier, Vermont.

Ed Koren

Ed Koren

You have plenty of opportunities to catch cartoonist Ed Koren in November. He’ll be at The Northshire Bookstore in Manchester, Vermont, on Saturday, November 3, at 6:00 pm; at Phoenix Books in Burlington, Vermont, on Thursday, November 15, at 7:00 pm; at Bear Pond Books in Montpelier, Vermont, on Friday, November 23, at 12:00 pm for a book signing; and at the Norman Williams Public Library in Woodstock, Vermont, on Tuesday, November 27, at 6:00 pm.

On Sunday, November 4, at 3:00 pm, poet Sue Ellen Thompson is giving a lecture on “Marriage, Metaphor, & Mortality: The Poetry of Jane Kenyon” at BigTown Gallery in Rochester, Vermont. The lecture explores Kenyon’s lifelong struggle with depression and her marriage to fellow poet Donald Hall.

Also on Sunday, November 4, the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, will be dedicating the Colony’s Library to James Baldwin, who was a resident at the Colony three times in the 1950s to work on his books. The outdoor ceremony at 11:00 am will be followed by light refreshments.

Eugene Lim will be reading as part of the Cleopatra Mathis Poetry & Prose Reading Series at Dartmouth College’s Sanborn Library, in Hanover, New Hampshire, on Tuesday, November 6, from 4:30 to 6:00 pm.

First Wednesdays, a program of the Vermont Humanities Council, brings DeRay McKesson to Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont, on Wednesday, November 7, at 7:00 pm to talk about politics and activism.

Catherine Lacey. Photo by Jesse Ball.

Catherine Lacey. Photo by Jesse Ball.

Catherine Lacey is at Bennington College in Bennington, Vermont, on Wednesday, November 7, at 7:00 pm, reading from her new short story collection, Certain American States.

On Tuesday, November 13, poet Kevin Goodan reads from his new collection, Anaphora, at Gibson’s Bookstore in Concord, New Hampshire. The reading begins at 5:30 pm.

Jeremy Holt visits Phoenix Books in Burlington, Vermont, on Tuesday, November 13, at 7:00 pm for his graphic novel, After Houdini.

Robin MacArthur will be at The Bennington Free Library in Bennington, Vermont, on Thursday, November 15, at 7:00 pm, in support of the paperback release of her fabulous novel, Heart Spring Mountain.

Kim Adrian

Kim Adrian

Poet Sidney Wade will be at the Fleming Museum of Art in Burlington, Vermont, for the Painted Word Poetry Series on Thursday, November 29, at 6:00 pm.

As part of the UNH Writers Series, Kim Adrian, author of the memoir The Twenty-Seventh Letter of the Alphabet, will be reading at the University of New Hampshire, in Durham, New Hampshire, on Thursday, November 29, at 5:00 pm.

Visit our calendar for detailed information about these events and more!

 

Worth a Drive

Edward Carey visits The Odyssey Bookshop in Hadley, Massachusetts, on Thursday, November 8, at 7:00 pm to read from his new novel, Little, about Madam Tussaud. The event is free but registration is requested.

 

Worth a Listen

We're Looking Forward to These November Releases

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Calls For Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

The AVA Gallery in Lebanon, New Hampshire is looking for its next batch of true-life storytellers for its December 13 Mudroom event. The theme is “Holiday Disasters.” Storytellers of all ages and from all towns in the Upper Valley and beyond are welcome to submit their stories for consideration by November 23. In your submission, include a brief summary of the story (no more than 300 words) and a short bio (no more than 150 words). For more information and to submit your story, please visit the AVA Gallery’s Mudroom page.

Marble House Project is a multi-disciplinary artist residency program in Dorset, Vermont, that fosters collaboration and the exchange of ideas by providing an environment for artists across disciplines to live and work side by side. The three-week Artist Residency is open to artists in all creative fields, including but not limited to visual arts, writing, choreography, music composition and performance. Applications for 2019 residencies are open through December 16. The application fee is $32. For more information, please visit the Residency Applications page.

Bloodroot Literary Magazine is accepting submissions of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction for their 2019 Digital Edition through December 31. Submission guidelines are available on the Bloodroot website.

The Frost Place is accepting submissions for their annual Chapbook Competition. The competition is open to any poet writing in English. The submission fee is $28. Submissions will be accepted through January 5, 2019. For more information, please visit the Chapbook Competition page.

Applications are now open for the Dartmouth Poet in Residence program at The Frost Place. This is a six-to-eight-week residency in poet Robert Frost’s former farmhouse in Franconia, New Hampshire. The residency begins July 1 and ends August 15, and includes an award of $1,000 from The Frost Place and an award of $1,000 from Dartmouth College. The recipient will have an opportunity to give a series of public readings across the region, including at Dartmouth College and The Frost Place. Applications will be accepted through January 5, 2019. For more information, please visit the Residency page.  

Every summer, the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, awards residency Fellowships to artists in seven disciplines, including literature. A Fellowship consists of exclusive use of a private studio, accommodations and three prepared meals a day for two weeks to two months. The deadline for the 2019 Summer MacDowell Literature Fellowship is January 15, 2019. The application fee is $30. For more information, please visit the Residency Application page.


Upcoming Workshops and Classes

Do you have an interview project in mind but don’t quite know where to begin or how to proceed? The Vermont Folklife Center is offering an “Oral History: An Introduction” workshop that can help you move your project forward. The workshop will be held on November 3, from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm at the Dorset Historical Society in Dorset, Vermont. Tuition is $95-$50. For more information and to register, please visit the Vermont Folklife Center Workshop page.

The pressure’s on if you’re participating in National Novel Writing Month, the creative writing project that challenges participants to write a 50,000 word manuscript in November. Take some of that pressure off with the free “NaNoWriMo Expressive Writing” workshop, lead by Joni B. Cole on November 5, at the Norwich Public Library in Norwich, Vermont, from 6:30 to 8:00 pm. This workshop invites you to write from a prompt to develop a character….add a plot twist…or discover a scene that’s just been waiting to burst onto the page. For more information, please visit the Writer’s Center of WRJ Workshops page.

Looking for quality instruction, feedback, and inspiration in a beautiful Vermont setting? This half-day retreat on November 10, from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, offers all that and more. You’ll have the opportunity to share pages of a new or revised work for personalized feedback, learn tips and techniques to get started and stay motivated, and reap the benefits of gathering within a supportive creative community. Both nervous beginners and seasoned authors are welcome. Tuition is $115 and must be paid in full prior to the retreat. For more information, or to register (required), please visit the Writer’s Center of WRJ Workshops page.

NaNoWriMo too easy? Become a Centurion by earning 100 poetry, essay, or short-story rejections in twelve months. Lead by R. W. W. Greene, this two-hour workshop hosted by the New Hampshire Writers’ Project will “take you through the steps of submitting your work, the mystery of rejectomancy, and the best methods of recuperation from a ‘thanks but no thanks.’” The workshop will be held on November 17, from 1:00 to 3:00 pm, at The Ford House on the campus of SNHU in Manchester, New Hampshire. $50 for NHWP members; $75 for non-members. For more information, please visit the NHWP Workshops page.

Storytelling is a powerful tool for the documentation of voices, memories, and histories. It can also be a catalyst for activism and social change. In this “Storytelling for Social Change” workshop—held on December 1, from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm at the Saint Albans Museum in Saint Albans, Vermont—we will explore the ethics and techniques of oral history, ethnography, and storytelling as activist research methodologies. Attendees will be invited to take a critical and analytical look at the history of documentary work, and will learn the basics of skills such as interviewing, story circle facilitation, and ethnographic observation. We will also cover the technical aspects of storytelling, providing an introduction to tools for minimal-resource and mobile audio recording. Tuition is $95-$50. For more information or to register, please visit the Vermont Folklife Center Workshop page.

The Dipper - April 2018

"The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know!

April News

We're excited to (finally) celebrate Robin MacArthur and her fabulous second book, Heart Spring Mountain, at the Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont, on Friday, April 6, at 7:00 pm. Reservations are recommended as seating is limited. We do hope you'll join us!

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If you haven't joined the Slow Club Book Club, please note that you can join anytime. The email announcing our second selection, Good Woman, poems by Lucille Clifton, just went out to subscribers, just in time for National Poetry Month. Even if you think you aren't a poetry fan, we hope you'll give our latest selection a try. Remember: it's fine to read slowly. You can dip in and out. Poetry is perfect for this. Pop the book in your tote or in your glovebox and you can read whenever you have a spare moment. We can't wait to hear what you think. Tag us on Instagram or Twitter with #slowclubbookclub or send us an email. We'd love to hear from you.

As we mentioned last month, we're partnering with JAG Productions and Yankee Bookshop to hold a one-meeting book group on Tuesday, May 15 to discuss Billie Holiday's autobiography, Lady Sings the Blues, at the Yankee Bookshop in Woodstock, Vermont. If you haven't signed up/bought your book, now's the time! A reminder that Yankee Bookshop has generously offered to donate $5 per book purchased at their store directly to JAG Productions. To read more about this event and to RSVP, visit our LN Events page.

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We want to wish a very Happy Book Birthday to Feast by Hannah Howard! We've got a lovely interview with Hannah and an excerpt from her book over on our blog.

Finally, make sure you celebrate Independent Bookstore Day on Saturday, April 28! We love our local indies: Yankee Bookshop, The Norwich Bookstore, and Left Bank Books. Show your favorite local independents some love.

 

April's Shooting Stars

A cool literary find from each of us to help light up your month!

  • Are you familiar with The Tournament of Books? The Morning News hosts one of my favorite events in March that I neglected to mention last month. No matter. You can go back and read up on all of the literary match-ups and see if you agree with the outcomes. —Shari
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  • There are a lot of great poetry podcasts out there—and I hope we'll talk about many of them here—but the one that really moved me recently is the March 21 New Yorker's Poetry Podcast with Marie Howe, who reads and discusses the work and loss of Lucie Brock-Broido and her shiver-inducing poem, "The American Security Against Foreign Enemies Act." Just that would have been enough, but then Marie reads one of her own remarkable poems, and then she and Kevin Young go on to talk about Seamus Heaney and one of my favorite books of his, Seeing Things, and, well, let's just say it's a riveting 38 minutes. —Rebecca

April Highlights

Donika Kelly

Donika Kelly

Donika Kelly, Melissa Febos, and Michael Dickman are reading at VCFA's Cafe Anna in Montpelier, Vermont, on Friday, April 6 at 5:30 pm.

On Saturday, April 7, The New Hampshire Institute of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire, is hosting the second annual Storytelling Festival from 2:00 to 4:00 pm. The festival features a variety of forms of storytelling and will be emceed by NHPR's Peter Biello.

In Montpelier, Vermont, PoemCity 2018 celebrates its ninth year with a variety of workshops, lectures, music, history, and art revolving around poetry throughout April. The festival opens with a keynote reading by Chard deNiord, Alice B. Fogel, and Stuart Kestenbaum on Saturday, April 7, at Lost Nation Theater. For more information about this and other festival events, visit the PoemCity website.

Meanwhile, PoemTown Randolph 2018 events are scheduled in Randolph, Vermont, throughout the month. The first event is on Monday, April 9 at 6:00 pm: dinner with poets Major Jackson and Didi Jackson at Black Krim Tavern, followed by readings. While you're in you're in Randolph, browse the more than one hundred poems by Vermont poets posted in windows all over town during April. See our calendar for more information about PoemTown Randolph events.

New England Review's Vermont Reading Series will be taking place at the Marquis Theater in Middlebury, Vermont, on Wednesday, April 11, featuring Didi Jackson, Jodi Paloni, Ben Pease, and Layla Santos. This event is free and open to the public.

Juan Felipe Herrera

Juan Felipe Herrera

Wednesday, April 11 also brings you readings from two former US Poet Laureates: Juan Felipe Herrera—reading at the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire, at 6:30 pm—and Billy Collins, reading at the Burr & Burton Academy in Manchester, Vermont, at  7:00 pm.

Spend Saturday, April 14, immersed in the 603: The Writers' Conference, the New Hampshire Writers' Project annual conference. The event, held on SNHU's campus in Manchester, New Hampshire, features keynote speaker Richard Russo, special guest Ann Hood, and an agenda full of master classes, workshops, a reception, and other events.

Bianca Stone and Alison Prine will be reading from their poetry collections at Bear Pond Books in Montpelier, Vermont, on Tuesday, April 17, at 7:00 pm.

Blair Braverman. Photo by Christina Bodznick

Blair Braverman. Photo by Christina Bodznick

Blair Braverman will be at the Sanborn Library at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, on Thursday, April 19 at 4:30 pm. We both adored her non-fiction book, Welcome to the Goddamn Ice Cube. Not to be missed!

Our friends at Green Writers Press are holding a Spring Celebration to celebrate the release of their new spring books in fiction and poetry. The celebration will be at 7:00 pm on Friday, April 20 at Next Stage Arts in Putney, Vermont. Sounds like a fun evening.

Five Colleges Book Sale in Lebanon, New Hampshire, will be happening at Lebanon High School on Saturday, April 21 and Sunday, April 22 (half price on Sunday!). For more information, visit their website.

Visit our calendar for detailed information about these events and more!

 

Worth a Drive

Leslie Jamison will be in conversation with literary critic and writer James Wood about her new non-fiction book, The Recovering, on Thursday, April 5, at 6:30 pm, at the Cambridge Public Library, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Leslie Jamison

Leslie Jamison

The Juniper Literary Festival will be held April 6 to 7 at UMass Amherst. The festival features readings, workshops, and a literary journal and book fair. Edie Meidav and Ocean Vuong will teach community workshops. For the full schedule of festival events, please visit their website.

The Newburyport Literary Festival takes place April 27 to 28 in Newburyport, Massachusetts, with Ann Hood, Tom Perrotta, Andre Dubus III, Mark Doty, and more. For more information, please visit the festival website.

 

Worth a Listen

Short Story podcast by BBC Radio 4. Just the perfect thing for your commute.

 

We're Looking Forward to These April Releases

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Calls For Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

The Vermont Writers Roundtable is holding a weekend workshop (June 22 to 24) in Londonderry, New Hampshire, on writing creative nonfiction for children and teens. The deadline to apply for this workshop is April 7. For more information and to apply, please visit the Workshop page.

The Odyssey Writing Workshop (June 4 to July 13) is accepting applications until April 7. The Odyssey workshop, for writers of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, is held on the campus of Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire. Prospective students must include a 4,000-word writing sample with their application. For more information, please visit the Workshop page.

Registration is open for 603: The Writers' Conference (April 14) on the SNHU campus in Manchester, New Hampshire. The keynote speaker is novelist Richard Russo. The conference includes master classes, workshops, panel discussions, lunch, and a reception. $85 to $135. For more information and to register, please visit the Conference page.

The Frost Place 2018 Conference on Poetry and Teaching (June 23 to 26) and Writing Intensive (June 27 to 28) is now accepting applications. The scholarship application deadline is April 19. The conference application deadline is May 17. The application fee is $25. Tuition is $725. Meals are $145. The Writing Intensive is $180. For more information and to apply, please visit the Conference page.

The Frost Place Conference on Poetry (July 8 to 14) is also accepting applications. The scholarship application deadline is April 30. The conference application deadline is May 31. The application fee is $25. Conference rates are from $250 (day rate) to $1550 (includes all tuition, meals, and lodging). For more information and to apply, please visit the Conference page.

Registration is still open for the VCFA Novel Retreat (May 15 to 21). Faculty includes Connie May FowlerJeff KleinmanRichard McCann, and Crystal Wilkinson. A $200 non-refundable deposit is required. For more information, please visit the Novel Retreat page.

The Bennington Review is open for submissions through May 15 with no reading fee. For more information, please visit the Bennington Review Submissions page.

nErDcampVT is accepting registrations for their "unconference" (May 20), which focuses on literacy, at Burlington High School in Burlington, Vermont. The event is free but you must register in advance. For more information and to register, please visit their website.

The New England Review is open for poetry and digital submissions through May 31. For more information, please visit the NER Submissions page.

The Frost Place Poetry Seminar (July 29 to August 3) is accepting applications. The scholarship application deadline is May 24. The seminar application deadline is June 28. The application fee is $15. Seminar rates are from $250 (day rate) to $1550 (includes all tuition, meals, and lodging). For more information and to apply, please visit the Seminar page.

Green Writers Press is accepting submissions through June 1 for the 2nd Annual Howard Frank Mosher First Novel and Short Story Prize. This prize is for a novelist or short story writer who writes about Vermont and/or the themes that resonate so well with Howard's work: nature, small-town stories, love, friendship, forgiveness, Vermont, solitude, and rural life. All ages are welcome to submit. For more information, please visit the Green Writers Press website.

The Hopper, a literary magazine from Green Writers Press, is accepting submissions of full-length manuscripts to its 2018 Hopper Poetry Prize through July 1. Open to poets with an identified interest in the natural world and whose work explores issues tied to our ever-changing environment. There is a $25 entry fee. For more information, please visit the Hopper Prize page.

Clara Martin Center is seeking submissions for their third annual art/poetry show entitled "Abundance: Celebrating Creativity in Mental Health, Wellness, and Recovery" (September 10 to November 2). You are invited to submit poetry, 2-D or 3-D artwork to display in the exhibit. Submissions are due by July 31. Applicants must be Vermont residents, and preference is given to artists/writers in the Upper Valley. For more information, please visit Clara Martin Center's website.

Registration is open for the 3rd Annual Poetry Festival at the Fine Arts Work Center (August 5 to 10) in Provincetown, Massachusetts. The Festival includes poetry and songwriting workshops. Faculty includes Traci Brimhall, Cornelius Eady, Nick Flynn, Vievee Francis, Ross Gay, Rebecca Gayle Howell, Patty Larkin, and Patrick Rosal. For information on tuition, housing, and registration, please visit the FAWC Festival page.

The Burlington Writers Workshop 2018 anthology team is pleased to invite submissions from the BWW community. Fiction, flash fiction, poetry, memoir, personal essay—it's all welcome. The only requirement for submission is that you must have attended at least one BWW workshop within the past five years. For more information, please visit the Burlington Writers Workshop website.

Registration is now open for The Center for Cartoon Studies Summer Workshops (June 11 to August 10), in White River Junction, Vermont. This year's workshops include everything from drawing and writing single-panel comics, to creating graphic memoirs and novels, taught by award-winning artists and writers, including Hilary Price, Jo Knowles, Tillie Walden, and Melanie Gillman. Tuition ranges from $600 to $1200. For more information and to register, please visit the Summer Workshops page.


April Workshops and Classes

On Monday, April 2 (6:30 to 8:30 pm), join poet Gary Margolis for "The Technique & Mysteries of Line Breaks," a poetry master class hosted by Burlington Writers Workshop, in Burlington, Vermont. Workshop participants should bring three original poems to class. Participants will also write new poems during the workshop. For more information and to register, please visit the BWW Workshop page.

Kingdom County Productions in collaboration with the Second Wind Foundation is offering a ten-week writing workshop for people who are in recovery from addiction, and their siblings and friends. The workshops will be held on Tuesdays, beginning Tuesday, April 3 (1:15 to 2:45 pm) at the Turning Point Center in White River Junction, Vermont. For more information, please call the Upper Valley Turning Point Center at (802) 295-5206 or visit the Writers for Recovery website.

Join storyteller Recille Hamrell for "The Art of Storytelling" workshop on Wednesday, April 4 (6:00 to 7:30 pm) at Burlington City Arts, in Burlington, Vermont, then stay for the open mic following the clinic to share your story in a safe and open-minded environment. The cost is $10. For more information and to register, please visit the BCA Event page.

On Saturday, April 7 (1:00 to 5:00 pm), Join River Arts in Morrisville, Vermont for a Coptic Bookbinding Workshop. Participants will select handmade papers for the hardbound coves and sew the open-spine binding using a traditional Coptic binding technique. The workshop fee is $85. For more information and to register, please visit the River Arts Programs page.

The League of Vermont Writers is hosting two workshops in April: "Getting Your Author Blog and Website Started" on Saturday, April 14 (4:00 to 6:00 pm) in Burlington, Vermont, and "The Road to Publication" on Saturday, April 28 (9:30 am to 3:00 pm), in Killington, Vermont. For more information and to register, please visit the League's Gatherings page.

On Tuesday, April 24 (6:30 pm), Annalisa Parent will host a workshop entitled "Writing for Pantsers" at The Galaxy Bookshop in Hardwick, Vermont. The workshop will focus on adding order to your writing life. For more information, visit The Galaxy Bookshop Events page.

Join poet Julia Shipley on Saturday, April 28 (10:00 am to 2:00 pm), for "The Husbandry of Poetry," a rumination and discussion of best practices for the care and feeding of poetry. The workshop is free, bur registration is required. For more information, please visit the River Arts Programs page.

The Center for Cartoon Studies offers a free One-Week Cartooning Workout. This seven-day email course is for aspiring cartoonists who need help getting started, cartoonists who need a refresher to get back into the creative groove, and those interested in graphic memoir, comics, journalism, or fantasy genres. Sign up at any time; the course begins when you sign up! For more information and to sign up, please visit the Center for Cartoon Studies website.

The Dipper - February 2018

"The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know!

 

February News

Here in New England, we're in the quiet heart of winter. But the minutes of daylight are accumulating on either end of the day, and if you listen quietly you can just begin to hear the gathering pulse of the spring and summer reading season.

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There's still plenty happening in this in between month, though. If you're a regular Dipper reader, you already know about our Slow Club Book Club, which began in January and will go all year long. We're so happily surprised by how many of you are joining us for our first book, A Whole Life, by Robert Seethaler. Haven't joined yet? It's never too late! We'll be sending our next SCBC  newsletter out to subscribers soon.

Predictions of dicey weather forced the postponement of Robin MacArthur's January reading from her new novel, Heart Spring Mountain, at the Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont. The new date is Friday, February 9, at 7:00 pm. We hope to see many of you there! In the meantime, you can read our interview with Robin on the blog.

Also starting Friday, February 9 is JAGFest 2.0 at the Briggs Opera House in White River Junction, Vermont. We recently had a chance to ask Nathan Yungerberg—author of Friday night's play, Esai's Table—a few questions. Check out our interview with Nathan.

In what looks to be an annual tradition for us, Shari and I are following in The Millions' footsteps, by sharing our "Year in Reading" with you. See Shari and Rebecca's lists on our blog. What were your favorite reads in 2017? Let us know and maybe can we share a reader's roundup here!

February's Shooting Stars

In this new feature, we'll each share one cool literary find to help light up your month...

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  • I'm eagerly anticipating Nafissa Thompson-Spires' new book, Heads of the Colored People. Check out her interview over at Electric Literature and pre-order her book from your local indie. —Shari
  • I'm loving the new blog, One Great Things, which delivers a mini literary review every Wednesday. So far, they've reviewed an essay, three poems, and a piece of flash fiction. I love their selections, insights, and enthusiasm. —Rebecca

February Highlights

James Crews (who was a featured poet at our Poetry & Pie event last year) will read from his book, Telling My Father, at the Northshire Bookstore in Manchester Center, Vermont, on Friday, February 9, at 6:00 pm.

Jennifer Tseng

Jennifer Tseng

Jennifer Tseng, poet and author of the chapbook The Passion of Woo & Isolde, will be reading at the New Hampshire Institute of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Monday, February 12, at 5:30 pm.

On Thursday, February 15, the Young Writers Project hosts its annual Vermont Writes Day. Writers of all ages are invited to take seven minutes to write. You can write in response to one of the supplied prompts, or write anything you like. For more information, visit the Young Writers Project website.

Every third Thursday, the Upper Valley Food Co-op in White River Junction, Vermont, hosts the Lettuce Write Poetry Series, a cost-free, judgement-free, all-ages event open to every poet and listener! Write a poem that relates to the monthly theme, and share it with the group. The next meeting is Friday, February 16, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm.

Bianca Stone has a new book of poetry, The Mobius Strip Club of Grief. Our friends Ruth and Jeremy at Antidote Books in Putney, Vermont, will be hosting an event for Bianca on Saturday, February 17, at 6:00 pm.

Haroon Moghul

Haroon Moghul

On Thursday, February 22, at 5:00 pm, Haroon Moghul, author of How to Be a Muslim: An American Story, will be leading a discussion and signing his book at Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire.

On Friday, February 23, novelist James Scott, poet Julia Shipley, and essayist Jericho Parms will be reading at Cafe Anna, on the campus of the Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier, Vermont. The readings begin at 5:30 pm.

As a part of the Painted Word Poetry Series, Michael Dickman will be at the Fleming Art Museum in Burlington, Vermont, Wednesday, February 28, at 6:00 pm.

 

Worth a Drive

Tayari Jones

Tayari Jones

On Thursday, February 8, at 8:00 pm, poet CA Conrad will be reading in Amherst, Massachusetts, as a part of the UMass Amherst's Visiting Writers Series. The reading will be held at in the Great Hall at Old Chapel on the UMass campus.

Tayari Jones will be at the Harvard Book Store in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Monday, February 12, at 7:00 pm to read from her new novel, An American Marriage.

 

Worth a Listen

Shari loved David Naimon's interview with Leni Zumas on his podcast, Between The Covers.

 

We're Looking Forward to These February Releases

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Calls For Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

The deadline to apply for one of Vermont Studio Center's 60+ month-long residency fellowships is February 15. All artists and writers living and working anywhere in the world are welcome to apply. For more information and to apply, please visit the VSC Fellowship page.

Bread Loaf Environmental Writers' Conference (June 1 to 7) is accepting applications through February 15. Faculty includes Brooks Haxton, Amber Flora Thomas, Luis Alberto Urrea, Ted Genoways, Deirdre Heekin, Scott Russell Sanders, and Ginger Strand. For more information, please visit the Conference page.

In neighboring Amherst, Massachusetts, applications are open for the Juniper Summer Writing Institute (July 17 to 24) and the Juniper Institute for Young Writers (July 22 to 29) at the University of Massachusetts. Faculty for the Juniper Summer Writing Institute includes Eileen Myles, Dorothea Lasky, Rickey Laurentiis, Dara Wier, Noy Holland, Mitchell S. Jackson, and Joy Williams. A non-refundable application fee for the Summer Writing Institute is required. There is no application fee for the Young Writers Institute. For more information about both institutes and to apply, please visit the Juniper Summer Writing Institute website.

    Hunger Mountain, the literary journal from VCFA, holds four annual contests: The Howard Frank Mosher Short Fiction PrizeThe Hunger Mountain Creative Nonfiction PrizeThe Ruth Stone Poetry Prize, and The Katherine Patterson Prize for Young Adult and Children's Writing. All contests are open to submissions through March 1. For more information, please visit their Contests page.

    Enter the Mass Poetry contest to have your poem included as part of Mass Poetry's Raining Poetry project. Excerpts from the winning poms will be displayed on the streets of Salem, Massachusetts to celebrate the 10th Massachusetts Poetry Festival (May 5 to 6). Use the submission form to submit up to three original poems on the broad theme of the body by March 1.

    The 2018 Frost Farm Prize for Metrical Poetry is open for entries through March 30. The winner receives $1,000 and an invitation, with honorarium, to read in June 2018 as part of The Hyla Brook Reading Series at the Robert Frost Farm. For more information and to enter, please visit the Frost Farm Prize page.

    Applications are open until March 31 for two scholarships at The Frost Place:

    • The Gregory Pardlo Scholarship for Emerging African American Poets is open to African American Poets writing in English who have published up to one book of poetry. The winner will receive a full scholarship to attend the Poetry Seminar, including room and board, and will give a featured reading at the Seminar. For more information, please visit the Gregory Pardlo Scholarship page.
    • The Latin@ Scholarship is open to applicants that self-identify as Latin@, have a strong commitment to the Latin@ community, and are at least 21 years of age. The winner will receive tuition, room and board, and travel for The Frost Place Conference on Poetry. For more information and to apply, please visit the Latin@ Scholarship page.

    Vermont Literary Review is taking submissions of creative work about New England until March 31. For more information, please visit Castleton University's website.

    The Odyssey Writing Workshop (June 4 to July 13) is accepting applications until April 7.  Odyssey workshop for writers of fantasy, science fiction, and horror, is held on the campus of Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire.. Prospective students must include a 4.000 word writing sample with their application. For more information, please visit the Workshop page.

    Registration is open for the VCFA Novel Retreat (May 15 to 21, 2018). Faculty includes Connie May FowlerJeff KleinmanRichard McCann, and Crystal Wilkinson. A $200 non-refundable deposit is required. For more information, please visit the Novel Retreat page.

    The Bennington Review is open for submissions through May 15 with no reading fee. For more information, please visit the Bennington Review Submissions page.

    The New England Review is open for poetry and digital submissions through May 31. For more information, please visit the NER Submissions page.

    Registration is open for the 3rd Annual Poetry Festival at the Fine Arts Work Center (August 5 to 10) in Provincetown, Massachusetts. The Festival includes poetry and songwriting workshops. Faculty includes Traci Brimhall, Cornelius Eady, Nick Flynn, Vievee Francis, Ross Gay, Rebecca Gayle Howell, Patty Larkin, and Patrick Rosal. For information on tuition, housing, and registration, please visit the FAWC Festival page.


    February Workshops and Classes

    February 9 to 11, Dani Shapiro will lead "The Stories We Carry: Meditation and Writing," a weekend-long workshop that blends meditation and movement, generative writing exercises, group sharing, and discussion. The workshop will be held at Kripalu, in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Tuition is $375. For more information and to register, please visit the Event page.

    On February 10, Bill Biddle is offering a workshop entitled "Making Slam Poetry and Preparing to Compete in a Poetry Slam" at Catamount Arts. This workshop is intended for writers new to poetry slams and is geared toward ages 12 and up. The workshop is free but registration is required. For more information and to register, please visit Catamount Arts.

    Join author and associate professor in the MFA program at the University of New Hampshire, Tom Paine, for an hour-long webinar titled “The Secret Architecture of Short Fiction.” The workshop will be held online, on Monday, February 12, from 7:00 to 8:00 pm. $10 for NHWP members; $25 for non-members. For more information and to register, please visit the New Hampshire Writers Project Workshops page.

    Steve Carter, co-owner of Maat Publishing is teaching a workshop called, "Making Scrivener Work for You" on Saturday, February 24, from 1:00 to 4:00 pm. This workshop will show you how to use Scrivener to write the first draft, manage characters and settings, develop the structure of your writing, revise, prepare your manuscript to be shared with beta readers, editors, and publishers, make an ebook, and more. $50 for NHWP members. $75 for non-members. The workshop will be held at The Ford House on the SNHU Campus in Manchester, New Hampshire. For more information and to register, please visit the New Hampshire Writers' Project Workshops page.

    Judith Hertog is teaching a five-week course, Dare to Write!, from February 27 through March 27 at The Writer's Center in White River Junction, Vermont. The focus of the workshop is personal nonfiction but fiction writers are welcome, too. For more information and to register, please visit The Writer's Center Workshops page.

    Interview: Robin MacArthur

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    Robin MacArthur's new novel, Heart Spring Mountain, will be released on January 9. Robin was gracious enough to answer a few questions about the process of writing this beautiful book, how she kept track of so many distinct voices, and a few other nosy questions. Thank you, Robin!

    p.s. We'll be celebrating Heart Spring Mountain at Robin's reading at the Norwich Bookstore on Wednesday, January 10 at 7:00 pm and we hope you'll join us. Please contact the Norwich Bookstore to reserve your seat.


    Literary North: Your book has at least seven distinct voices who speak in separate chapters. Is there one particular voice/character that you feel most connected to, or is your own voice distributed among many or all of them?

    Robin MacArthur: One of the reasons I write is that living one life, in one body, is difficult for me. I am a hungry ghost of sorts—perpetually craving new opportunities, new rooms, new roads diverging in a wood. Like Whitman, “I contain multitudes,” and when I write fiction I get to transcend the boundaries and limitations of this one lived experience, and become (or put to form) those multitudes. Which is to say: there is a part of each of those characters that is very much me. If I couldn’t empathize with my characters, I don’t believe they would ring true on the page, and I wouldn’t feel comfortable writing them. I am Stephen with his desire for solitude. I am Lena’s romanticism and lyricism. I am Hazel’s regrets and Vale’s hunger. I am Bonnie’s heart as a mother. But if I had to choose one that is most me, I think it would be Deb. She’s twenty years older than me, and her biography is nothing like mine, but her fears for the world, her meditations on aging, and her ruminations on motherhood are straight from my gut to hers.

    LN: The story in Heart Spring Mountain ranges through many times, voices, perspectives, even locations. How did you keep track of all of this? Did you use a spreadsheet, a timeline on your wall, or some other method?

    RM: Oh, gray strands appeared in my hair trying to keep track of all this! I drew multiple family trees that I had to reference regularly.  I was constantly calculating characters’ ages in different scenes. I didn’t outline this book ahead of time, so the trickiest part was that things kept changing as I wrote. Once I discovered a part of the story, all the years would shift, and suddenly I’d have to go back and rewrite everything that had come before. A timeline on the wall would have helped. Also: my copy editor, Margaret Wimberger, who happens to live close by, is brilliant and saved my butt in this regard. I bow down to copy editors.

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    LN: We love that you mention Grace Paley a few times. Is she a favorite author of yours? What does Grace's writing mean to you and to this story and these characters?

    RM: I do love Grace Paley’s writing. I also love her biography, and verve, and the ways she interwove a life of writing with mothering and activism. I’m always seeking role models who dedicate themselves to those three projects; who recognize that words are powerful medicine, but that taking to the streets to serve the betterment of humankind is essential, too. As is baking cookies with your children. To me, Paley is a touchstone for how to live a life that serves and reveres both beauty and resistance; the life of the spirit and the hard necessities of human need, and that honors and recognizes how those things are connected (which is a theme in my book as well).

    LN: When you look back to writing Heart Spring Mountain, what was going on in your life at the time? What was inspiring you as you wrote?

    RM: One thing I love about the novel is how it can evolve and stretch as your life evolves during the era of its writing. I wrote the first fragments of this book nine years ago when I was first becoming a mother. The concerns then were motherhood—how to love, and give of oneself, and do so well. I picked the book up six years later and my concerns were different: tropical storm Irene had torn through southern Vermont, and climate-induced environmental disasters were ruthless and everywhere. My hometown had become wracked by the opioid epidemic. All I could think about were the ailments of the world, and how they were linked: how the machinations of capitalization had led to a loss of connection to one another, and to the natural landscape, to the wisdom of our ancestors. At that point the question of the book became: we are so broken. Everywhere. How do we heal?

    LN: What was the most memorable thing you've read in the past month?

    RM: I just began reading The Singing Creek Where the Willows Grow: The Mystical Nature Diary of Opal Whitely, and it is divine. I’m trying to pull back from social media and the news these days (without giving up on resistance), and reading books that were written one hundred years ago or more is proving to be a great salve. I also just re-read Thoreau’s Walking, and am looking forward to re-reading Anna Karenina. As for the characters in my book, sometimes the past is just the thing I need to illuminate the future.

    The Dipper - January 2018

    "The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know

     

    January News

    Happy New Year!

    2018 has barely begun and it's already shaping up to be a very exciting year for Literary North and our friends. We have a lot of plans and we can't wait to share them all with you. But first we'll let you in on some great events happening in just the first few weeks of the new year.

    We hope this fresh year brings you many good things, including good books, good friends, and good health.

    —Shari & Rebecca

     

    Start Your Year at the Right Pace with the Slow Club Book Club

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    As many of you know, we're announcing the Slow Club Book Club* for 2018! Over the course of the coming year, we'll read four books we've chosen to appeal to the quiet and unhurried in us. We'll start reading our first book this month. If this sounds appealing to you, subscribe to our TinyLetter newsletter to find out more and learn the title of our first book. We really hope you'll join us.

    *Shout out to Robin MacArthur for our club name!

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    Be the first to hear a Reading from Heart Spring Mountain

    Speaking of Robin, our first event of 2018 is the celebration of Robin MacArthur's new novel Heart Spring Mountain, which is being released on January 9Join us at the Norwich Bookstore on Wednesday, January 10 at 7:00 pm for her first official reading. We'll be there to celebrate and provide the refreshments. Reservations are strongly recommended, as seating is limited. Please contact the Norwich Bookstore to reserve your seat.

     

    Support Emerging African-American Playwrights at JAGFest 2.0

    And finally, mark your calendars for JAGFest 2.0, February 9 to 11 at Brigg's Opera House in White River Junction, Vermont! JAGFest is a performing arts festival put on by Jarvis Green's production company, JAG Productions. The festival features new works that celebrate the talents of African-American playwrights and performing artists. 

    JAGFest2018

    Over the course of three days, JAG will present four staged readings of new works that are written, directed, and performed by Black theatre artists. The weekend-long festival of play readings celebrates and explores diverse, new voices in American theater. Each performance features a post-show conversation with the playwrights, actors, directors and Dartmouth scholars.

    Tickets are on sale now. Single tickets are $15 per performance, or buy a weekend pass that includes access to all presentations for $50!

    We're huge fans of Jarvis Green and JAG Productions, and are honored to be a sponsor of this incredible festival. We'll be sharing more information with you about the playwrights and their plays in January, so stay tuned!


    January Highlights

    Lauren Markham

    Lauren Markham

    Lauren Markham reads from her non-fiction book, The Faraway Brothers, at VCFA in Montpelier, Vermont, on Wednesday, January 3, at 7:00 pm.

    Jenny Boully and Jill McCorkle read at Bennington College's Tishman Lecture Hall, in Bennington, Vermont, on Thursday, January 4, at 7:00 pm, as a part of Bennington's Writers Reading series. Other authors in the series include Claire Vaye Watkins, Major Jackson, Stuart Nadler, Clifford Thompson, Alexander Chee, and Allan Gurganus. See our calendar for more details.

    Francisco Cantú will be at the New Hampshire Institute of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Sunday, January 7, at 7:00 pm, to read from his upcoming book, The Line Becomes a River.

    Francisco Cantú

    Francisco Cantú

    Jelani Cobb will give a talk on free speech on college campuses at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, on Wednesday, January 10, at 4:30 pm.

    Dan Chaon will be reading at the Vermont Studio Center in Johnson, Vermont, on Wednesday, January 24, at 8:00 pm.

    Jeffrey Lent will lead a tribute to Howard Frank Mosher at the Norwich Bookstore on Wednesday, January 31, at 7:00 pm. Come out and celebrate Mosher's final book, Points North.

     

    Worth a Drive

    Fiona Mozley

    Fiona Mozley

    Fiona Mozley, whose novel, Elmet, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, will be at the Harvard Bookstore, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Tuesday, January 16 with Hallgrimur Helgason. The reading begins at 7:00 pm.

     

     

    We're Looking Forward to These January Releases

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    Calls For Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

    In neighboring Amherst, Massachusetts, applications open on January 1 for the Juniper Summer Writing Institute (July 17 to 24) and the Juniper Institute for Young Writers (July 22 to 29) at the University of Massachusetts. Faculty for the Juniper Summer Writing Institute includes Eileen Myles, Dorothea Lasky, Rickey Laurentiis, Dara Wier, Noy Holland, Mitchell S. Jackson, and Joy Williams. A non-refundable application fee for the Summer Writing Institute is required. There is no application fee for the Young Writers Institute. For more information about both institutes and to apply, please visit the Juniper Summer Writing Institute website.

    Applications are currently open until March 31 for two scholarships at The Frost Place:

    • The Gregory Pardlo Scholarship for Emerging African American Poets is open to African American Poets writing in English who have published up to one book of poetry. The winner will receive a full scholarship to attend the Poetry Seminar, including room and board, and will give a featured reading at the Seminar. For more information, please visit the Gregory Pardlo Scholarship page.
    • The Latin@ Scholarship is open to applicants that self-identify as Latin@, have a strong commitment to the Latin@ community, and are at least 21 years of age. The winner will receive tuition, room and board, and travel for The Frost Place Conference on Poetry. For more information and to apply, please visit the Latin@ Scholarship page.

    The Frost Place is accepting submissions for its 2018 Chapbook Competition until January 5. The competition is open to any poet writing in English. Entries must be accompanied by a $28 entry fee. For details about submitting your manuscript and more information about the competition, please visit their Competition page.

    Also until January 5The Frost Place is accepting applications for the Dartmouth Poet in Residence program, a six-to-eight-week residency in Robert Frost's former farmhouse. The residency is July 1 to August 15, and includes an award of $1,000 from The Frost Place and $1,000 from Dartmouth College. For more information and to apply online, please visit their Residency page.

    Applications for the 2018 MacDowell Colony Summer Residency (June 1 to September 30, 2018)  are being accepted through January 15.  A residency consists of exclusive use of a studio, accommodations, and three prepared meals a day for up to eight weeks. For more information, please visit the Application Guidelines page.

    Registration is open for the League of Vermont Writers' Winter Program and Annual Business Meeting (June 27). The theme of the meeting is "New Directions, New Journeys: Writing Resources for Vermont Writers" and will be held at Trader Duke's Hotel in South Burlington, Vermont. $45 for members; $55 for non-members. Registration is open until January 24. For more information and to register, please visit the Meeting page.

    Hunger Mountain, the literary journal from VCFA, holds four annual contests: The Howard Frank Mosher Short Fiction PrizeThe Hunger Mountain Creative Nonfiction PrizeThe Ruth Stone Poetry Prize, and The Katherine Patterson Prize for Young Adult and Children's Writing. All contests are open to submissions through March 1. For more information, please visit their Contests page.

    Vermont Literary Review is taking submissions of creative work about New England until March 31. For more information, please visit Castleton University's website.

    Registration is now open for the VCFA Writing Novels for Young People Retreat (March 23 to 25, 2018). Faculty includes Donna GephartNova Ren SumaAmanda MacielMaggie Lehrman, and Sarah Aronson. A $200 deposit is required (refundable if the retreat is able to fill your spot). For more information please visit the Writing Novels for Young People Retreat page.

    Registration is also open for the VCFA Novel Retreat (May 15 to 21, 2018). Faculty includes Connie May FowlerJeff KleinmanRichard McCann, and Crystal Wilkinson. A $200 non-refundable deposit is required. For more information, please visit the Novel Retreat page.

    The New England Review is open for poetry and digital submissions through May 31. For more information, please visit the NER Submissions page.

    The Bennington Review is open for submissions through May 15, 2018 with no reading fee. For more information, please visit the Bennington Review Submissions page.


    January Workshops and Classes

    Joni Cole leads "Sunday Surges," a four-session, weekly workshop for fiction and creative non-fiction writers. This workshop, which meets Sundays, January 7 to 28, from 4:00 to 6:00 pm, is a great way to generate material, revise with direction, and make solid progress on your prose project. Each meeting provides you with a deadline to assure you are producing consistently. You will be asked to read aloud excerpts from a work-in-progress (three or so double-spaced pages, given time constraints) at each of our meetings. The discussion of these “surges” allows for quality feedback, and fosters teachable moments that benefit every participant in the group. $145 (minimum 4 participants; maximum 6). Preregistration is required. For more information and to register, email jonibethcole@gmail.com.

    Join science fiction author and 2014 NH Flash Fiction winner Ed Ting for an hour-long “Introduction to Flash Fiction” webinar on Tuesday, January 9. This webinar will take a peek at what Flash Fiction is, how you can get started writing it, and how to craft elements to make your story work. You will walk away with the tools you need to tell your three-minute story. Then, when you have your story written, join your writing peers at one of the 2018 Three-Minute Flash Fiction competitions held statewide. $10 for NHWP members, $25 for nonmembers. The event is nonrefundable. For more information and to register, please visit the New Hampshire Writer's Project Workshops page.

    Poet James Crews will lead a two-week, online workshop titled "Mindfulness and Writing" from Sunday, January 14 to Sunday, January 28. Examine connections between the practice of meditation/mindfulness and the act of writing fearlessly from the heart. Using quotes and other written works as prompts, we will complete several exercises each week that invite us to pay closer attention to ourselves, our lives, and the world around us as we do our best to define the term, "mindfulness," and what it means for each of us. Beginners and all skill levels are welcome. You do not need any previous experience with mindfulness, meditation or online courses; all you need is a reliable internet connection and an open mind. The cost is $95. For more information and to register, please visit the event page at the Northshire Bookstore website.

    Join Vermont poet laureate Chard deNiord for a Poetry Master Class on Monday, January 8, from 6:30 to 8:00 pm at the Burlington Writers Workshop in Burlington, Vermont. This workshop will focus on reading and writing poems whose speakers place another before them, and then make charged figurative connections to what Walt Whitman called “the other I am.” We will read each other’s poems line by line, examining line breaks, poetic strategy, form, intention, imagery, tropes, verbal music, and what John Keats described in his definition of “negative capability” as the ability to “exist in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason.” In addition to writing poems with transpersonal speakers, we will also write a few persona poems as class exercises. For more information and to RSVP, please visit the Burlington Writers Workshop Meetup page.

    On Monday, January 22, from 6:30 to 8:00 pm, join poet Gary Margolis for a Poetry Master Class at the Burlington Writers Workshop in Burlington, Vermont. This workshop will reflect on the poetic line by looking at examples, including those we'll write in this workshop. Workshop participants should bring three original poems to this class. We'll also write new ones during the workshop. For more information and to RSVP, please visit the Burlington Writers Workshop Meetup page.