Chapbook Competition

The Dipper - January 2019

"The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know

 

January News

Hello and welcome to 2019! We hope you all had a peaceful holiday season and had some time to read new or favorite old books between feasts, walks in the snow, movie watching, or however you celebrated the days. Did you get any books on your wish list for gifts? Or books you didn’t even know existed that you’re excited about? We sure did, and hope you did too!

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This month marks the start of the second year of the Slow Club Book Club and we’re incredibly excited to be devoting the entire year to women in translation.

Our first book for 2019 is The Emissary, by Yoko Tawada, translated by Margaret Mitsutani. This novel recently won the National Book Foundation’s prize for Translated Literature and is one of Library Journal’s Best Books of 2018.

If this book sounds interesting to you, we hope you’ll join as as we slowly read it from now through March. If you’re not already a member of SCBC, you can join by subscribing to the newsletter. And if you have suggestions for books written and translated by women (remember, they don’t have to be recent books; we love reading books from the past), drop us a line. We have a list of ideas already, but we always love suggestions from our faithful readers.

Now that we’ve turned the corner into the new year, the calendar of events for January is starting to really fill out. In particular, January seems to be a good time for workshops and classes. Check out the long list of upcoming workshops at the end of this newsletter. It’s a positive blizzard of choices!

Speaking of events, we’re setting aside a morning later this week for our first annual Literary North Retreat, where we’ll drink tea, eat something delicious, review our notes from 2018, and go through our wish lists to figure out the events and projects we want to pursue in 2019. We already have a couple of exciting ideas percolating, and we can’t wait to figure it all out and share our plans with you in the coming months.

Here’s to 2019! May it be a year of good health and good books for you all.


January’s Shooting Stars

A cool literary find from each of us to help light up your month!

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  • New year, new literary journal subscription? Last year I subscribed to The Sewanee Review and loved every issue. In the past, I’ve subscribed to Zyzzva and One Story. This year I’m thinking about subscribing to The White Review, but I’m open to other suggestions. It’s a great way to keep up with contemporary fiction. —Shari

  • The end of the year always brings a deluge of Best Of lists. One of my particular favorites is Glass Poetry editor Anthony Frame’s Recommended Reading list, an annual tradition since 2015. The list highlights Anthony’s favorite poems of the year that appeared in journals and magazines. It’s always a terrific collection, and it’s nicely accessible: you can just click and read a poem without having to buy a new book or leave your house. —Rebecca

January Highlights

For the month of January, if you donate blood at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire, they will buy a children’s book from The Norwich Bookstore to donate to the kids at CHaD (Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock). So, you can do two good deeds at once: help save someone’s life, and give a kid a book. Get all the details and schedule your donation on the DHMC website.

The Visiting Writers for the Winter Residency at VCFA in Montpelier, Vermont, will be giving readings January 3 through 5 at the chapel in College Hall at 7:00 pm. Carmen Maria Machado will read on January 3, Terrance Hayes on January 4, and Liara Tamani on January 5.

Start your new year off right with Bennington College’s Writers Reading Series in Bennington, Vermont, which begins on Thursday, January 3 with Douglas Bauer and Carmen Gimenez Smith. The series wraps up on Friday, January 11 with Garth Greenwell and Mark Wunderlich. All readings are held at the College’s Tishman Lecture Hall, from 7:00 to 8:00 pm (except for the January 10 reading, which begins at 7.30 pm).

Chana Porter. Photo by Stella Kalinina

Chana Porter. Photo by Stella Kalinina

Hannah Tinti and Chana Porter will be reading at the Haybarn Theater at Goddard College in Plainfield, Vermont, on Monday, January 7 and Tuesday, January 9, respectively. Both readings begin at 7:00 pm.

On Thursday, January 17, Jonathan Miles will be in conversation with New York Times book critic, Dwight Garner, at The Northshire Bookstore in Manchester, Vermont. The event begins at 6:00 pm.

Thomas Christopher Greene, president of VCFA, will be at Phoenix Books, in Essex, Vermont, on Tuesday, January 22 at 6:30 pm and at The Northshire Bookstore, in Manchester, Vermont, on Thursday, January 24, at 6:00 pm with his latest novel, The Perfect Liar. The official book launch will take place at Bear Pond Books in Montpelier, Vermont, on Tuesday, January 29.

Kevin Young

Kevin Young

On Sunday, January 27, Dartmouth College celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day with a multi-faith celebration featuring the Dartmouth Gospel Choir and poet Kevin Young. The celebration begins at 3:00 pm at Rollins Chapel in Hanover, New Hampshire.

Emily Bernard, author of Black is the Body, will launch her book on Tuesday, January 29, at 6:30 pm at Phoenix Books in Burlington, Vermont.

Cognitive psychologist and linguist, Steven Pinker, will be discussing his new book, Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress at The Music Hall in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on Wednesday, January 30, at 7:00 pm as part of the Writers on a New England Stage series. Tickets are $13.75 (plus $18 book voucher).

Alex Mar is reading from her new memoir, Witches of America, on Thursday, January 31 at 4:30 pm at Dartmouth College’s Sanborn Library in Hanover, New Hampshire. This reading is part of the Cleopatra Mathis Poetry & Prose Reading Series.

Visit our calendar for detailed information about these events and more!

 

Worth a Drive

Daisy Johnson, whose novel Everything Under, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, will be at the Harvard Bookstore in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on Thursday, January 31 at 7:00 pm.

 

Worth a Listen

I really enjoyed listening to John Wray talk about his reading life on episode 15 of The Spine. —Shari

 

We're Looking Forward to These January Releases

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Calls For Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

The Frost Place is accepting submissions for their annual Chapbook Competition until January 5. The competition is open to any poet writing in English. The submission fee is $28. For more information, please visit the Chapbook Competition page.

Applications are being accepted through January 5 for the Dartmouth Poet in Residence program at The Frost Place. This is a six-to-eight-week residency in poet Robert Frost’s former farmhouse in Franconia, New Hampshire. The residency begins July 1 and ends August 15, and includes an award of $1,000 from The Frost Place and an award of $1,000 from Dartmouth College. The recipient will have an opportunity to give a series of public readings across the region, including at Dartmouth College and The Frost Place. For more information, please visit the Residency page.  

Every summer, the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, awards residency Fellowships to artists in seven disciplines, including literature. A Fellowship consists of exclusive use of a private studio, accommodations and three prepared meals a day for two weeks to two months. The deadline for the 2019 Summer MacDowell Literature Fellowship is January 15. The application fee is $30. For more information, please visit the Residency Application page.

The Juniper Summer Writing Institute in Amherst, Massachusetts (June 16 to 22) is accepting applications. The institute includes manuscript consultations, craft sessions, workshops, readings, and other events, led by a wide range of instructors, including CAConrad, Gabriel Bump, Ross Gay, Khadijah Queen, Bianca Stone, Ocean Vuong, Dara Weir, and Joy Williams. The non-refundable application fee is $40. For more information and to apply, please visit the Juniper Institute website.


Upcoming Workshops and Classes

On January 4 from noon to 1:00 pm, Joni B. Cole will be discussing how to foster wellness through expressive writing at Open Door Integrative Wellness in White River Junction, Vermont. Expressive writing, also known as reflective or introspective writing, invites individuals to respond to a “prompt” as a means of exploring their thoughts and feelings, and tapping into the unconscious. At this free “Lunch and Learn” session, Joni will discuss the value of expressive writing to you and to your organization. She’ll also facilitate a brief hands-on demonstration, so bring something to write on/with. For more information or to RSVP, email Joni at jonibethcole@gmail.com.

Learn simple bookbinding at a DIY Bookbinding class from 6:00 to 8:00 pm on January 8 at Words & Pictures in Essex, Vermont. This class will demonstrate simple techniques for binding small DIY-ed books, including saddle stitch (stapled) binding, perfect binding, and a couple different types of sewn binding. $15, includes materials. For more information and to register, please visit the Words & Pictures Workshop page.

Writing can be a powerful, cathartic means of coping with life's greatest hardships, including the illness and death of loved ones. In the Writing Group for People Experiencing Loss workshop, discover ways that writing may allow grief to move and evolve. Co-Facilitated by Jenny Gelfan, MAed & Jessica Stout, MSW, this workshop will meet Thursdays at 12:00 pm from January 10 through February 14 at the Jack Byrne Center at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, in Lebanon, New Hampshire. Enrollment space is limited. For more information or to RSVP, please email Amanda M. Reinemann or call her at (603) 308-2447.

On January 13, Carly Winn will lead Writing Ecospsychology: A Writing and Meditation workshop from 2:30 to 4:00 pm at Open Door Integrative Wellness in White River Junction, Vermont. This workshop is an introduction to writing ecopsychology, the interaction of the psyche and the landscape. You will learn to tell the story of your own interaction with the natural world. The workshop will include a discussion of craft, a brief analysis of some samples of ecopsychology writing, a short free-write exercise, and guided meditation. For more information or to register, please email Carly at carly3ski@gmail.com.

The OSHER@Dartmouth winter term is offering several courses for writers and readers, including “Completing Your Manuscript,” “Four Women Poets of Northeast Scotland,” “Poems from the 20th Year of Seven Centuries,” “Renaissance Classics,” “Sherlock Holmes,” “The Poetry of T.S. Eliot & Wallace Stevens,” and “Writing in Circles.” Tuition ranges from $40 to $80. Classes are open only to members ($70 fee). Courses begin the week of January 14 and meet at various locations in Hanover, New Hampshire. For more information and to register, please visit the OSHER@Dartmouth website.

The League of Vermont Writers’ annual business meeting and winter writing craft workshop will take place at Trader Duke’s Hotel in South Burlington, Vermont, on January 19, 2019. This year’s theme, “Honing Your Craft: Writing that Sizzles,” features workshops and discussions led by two well-published Vermont authors: Julia Shipley and Sean Prentiss. $46 for League members; $56 or non-members (includes morning refreshments and lunch). The deadline to register is January 6. Fore more information and to register, please visit the League’s Gatherings page.

The New Hampshire Writers’ Project is hosting a Travel Writing workshop, led by author Dan Szczesny on the campus of SNHU in Manchester, New Hampshire, from 10:00 am to noon on January 19, 2019. Registration is $50 for NHWP members; $70 for non-members. For more information and to register, please visit the NHWP Workshops page.

Sick of using the cut and paste method for creating your zines? In this InDesign: Make a Zine workshop held on January 22, from 6:00 to 9:00 pm at Words & Pictures in Essex, Vermont, you will learn how to design a simple eight-page, half-letter zine in InDesign. This is a beginner level class, which will cover setting up a document, adding text and images, and exporting the document for print or online distribution. $50. For more information and to register, please visit the Words & Pictures Workshop page.

Also at Words & Pictures, learn how to make a one-sheet comic or zine that can be easily reproducible and attributable at the One Sheet Comic/Zine Jam on January 26 from 6:00 to 8:30 pm in Essex, Vermont. All experience levels welcome! $5 suggested donation for use of space and materials, but no one will be turned away. For more information or to register, please visit the Words & Pictures Workshop page.

Learn to hand-bind a journal for writing or drawing at a Bookbinding Journals workshop on Saturday, January 26, from 1:00 to 5:00 pm, at River Arts in Morrisville, Vermont. The workshop covers everything from selecting handmade papers to sewing the open-spine binding using traditional techniques. $85, including materials. For more information and to register, please visit the River Arts Adult Classes page.

The AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire, is offering an Expressive Arts workshop, on Monday evenings from January 28 through February 18. Expressive Arts offers an engaging experience with different modes of art making and materials—clay, painting, stitching, moving, sound, and writing—to understand your potential for insight, creative curiosity, self care, and deep connection. $136 for members; $160 for non-members. For more information and to register, please visit the AVA Gallery website.

Poet James Crews will be offering his four-week Mindfulness and Writing Online workshop from February 2 to March 9. In this generative online writing workshop, we'll examine connections between the practice of meditation/mindfulness and the act of writing fearlessly from the heart. Though not required, attendees will be invited to share their work via email with each other. Beginners and all skill levels are welcome. You do not need any previous experience with mindfulness, meditation or online courses; all you need is an internet connection, email and an open mind. $295 for four session. For more information and to register, please visit the Northshire Books events page.

On March 9, from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm, the AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire, is offering a “One Photo, Four Stories” writing workshop where you will ue a photo of your choice as a prompt for four separate stories. This class is open to all levels. $68 for members; $80 for non-members. For more information and to register, please visit the AVA Gallery website.

Already dreaming of summer? Registration for Summer Workshops at The Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont, are already open. This year’s workshops include Graphic Memoirs with Melanie Gillman, Creating Graphic Novels for the Young Adult Market with Jo Knowles and Tillie Walden, and a Graphic Novel Workshop with Paul Karasik. For all the details and to register, please visit the CCS 2019 Summer Workshops page.

The Dipper - November 2018

"The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know

 

November News

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Want to hear some gorgeous music, listen to two fabulous authors read, take part in a conversation about the writing process, and stuff your face with homemade biscuits? Well then, look no further than our own Writers’ Process Night happening this Saturday, November 3 at Open Door in White River Junction, Vermont.

Join us, Laura Jean Binkley, Camille Guthrie, and Peter Orner, and a mountain of biscuits made by Literary North’s favorite baker and all-around fan, Dr. Hermann Puterschein. Scurry over to the Event page now and claim your seat at the biscuit bar! See you on Saturday!

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Slow Club Book Club members, have you started reading our final book of 2018 yet? If not, please don’t worry; you’re in fantastic company! At least one of your SCBC hosts hasn’t started either. And guess what? That’s just fine. October always seems to be a month when everything hits the fan at once. Between finally waking up from the summer drowsies and suddenly realizing that the end of the year crazies are nigh, this time of year is often overstuffed with deadlines, new projects, school meetings, and making appointments to get winter tires put on. Never fear… Sara Maitland’s A Book of Silence will wait patiently for you to dip in as you have time, maybe while waiting for those tires to be changed.

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It always feels a bit awkward to promote one’s own stuff, but if you can’t do it in your own newsletter, where can you? So this is just to say… Rebecca has written a science book about rivers for kids aged 7 to 10, and it's coming out later this month! Rivers and Streams! is part of a set of four “Explore Waterways” books published by the excellent Nomad Press in White River Junction, Vermont. It’s packed with really fun illustrations by the very talented Tom Casteel, and it includes 25 river-related activities. If you have a young person in your life who’s into science—or even one who isn’t yet into science—check out the set, or the many other wonderful non-fiction books for kids that Nomad publishes.

November’s Shooting Stars

A cool literary find from each of us to help light up your month!

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  • Tommy Orange’s review of Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah in The New York Times was fantastic. Here’s a snippet:

“Now more than ever I believe fiction can change minds, build empathy by asking readers to walk in others’ shoes, and thereby contribute to real change. In “Friday Black,” Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah has written a powerful and important and strange and beautiful collection of stories meant to be read right now, at the end of this year, as we inch ever closer to what feels like an inevitable phenomenal catastrophe or some other kind of radical change, for better or for worse. And when you can’t believe what’s happening in reality, there is no better time to suspend your disbelief and read and trust in a work of fiction—in what it can do.”

—Shari

  • I’m in a bit of a glum mood, what with the current dreary weather and the state of the world and all, so Emily Dickinson’s Patreon page in The New Yorker is giving me a welcome lift as I put the finishing touches on this newsletter. I’ll be scraping my shekels together to afford patronage at $100 a month (“I will tell you which parts of the Bible would be made better with bees. Plus all previous rewards.”) How about you? —Rebecca


November Highlights

On Friday, November 2, at 7:30 pm, GunSense Vermont, the Unitarian Church of Montpelier, and Bear Pond Books present “Bullets Into Bells: Poets and Citizens Respond to Gun Violence.” This event features Major Jackson, Matthew Olzmann, and Kerrin McCadden and takes place at the Unitarian Church in Montpelier, Vermont.

Ed Koren

Ed Koren

You have plenty of opportunities to catch cartoonist Ed Koren in November. He’ll be at The Northshire Bookstore in Manchester, Vermont, on Saturday, November 3, at 6:00 pm; at Phoenix Books in Burlington, Vermont, on Thursday, November 15, at 7:00 pm; at Bear Pond Books in Montpelier, Vermont, on Friday, November 23, at 12:00 pm for a book signing; and at the Norman Williams Public Library in Woodstock, Vermont, on Tuesday, November 27, at 6:00 pm.

On Sunday, November 4, at 3:00 pm, poet Sue Ellen Thompson is giving a lecture on “Marriage, Metaphor, & Mortality: The Poetry of Jane Kenyon” at BigTown Gallery in Rochester, Vermont. The lecture explores Kenyon’s lifelong struggle with depression and her marriage to fellow poet Donald Hall.

Also on Sunday, November 4, the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, will be dedicating the Colony’s Library to James Baldwin, who was a resident at the Colony three times in the 1950s to work on his books. The outdoor ceremony at 11:00 am will be followed by light refreshments.

Eugene Lim will be reading as part of the Cleopatra Mathis Poetry & Prose Reading Series at Dartmouth College’s Sanborn Library, in Hanover, New Hampshire, on Tuesday, November 6, from 4:30 to 6:00 pm.

First Wednesdays, a program of the Vermont Humanities Council, brings DeRay McKesson to Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont, on Wednesday, November 7, at 7:00 pm to talk about politics and activism.

Catherine Lacey. Photo by Jesse Ball.

Catherine Lacey. Photo by Jesse Ball.

Catherine Lacey is at Bennington College in Bennington, Vermont, on Wednesday, November 7, at 7:00 pm, reading from her new short story collection, Certain American States.

On Tuesday, November 13, poet Kevin Goodan reads from his new collection, Anaphora, at Gibson’s Bookstore in Concord, New Hampshire. The reading begins at 5:30 pm.

Jeremy Holt visits Phoenix Books in Burlington, Vermont, on Tuesday, November 13, at 7:00 pm for his graphic novel, After Houdini.

Robin MacArthur will be at The Bennington Free Library in Bennington, Vermont, on Thursday, November 15, at 7:00 pm, in support of the paperback release of her fabulous novel, Heart Spring Mountain.

Kim Adrian

Kim Adrian

Poet Sidney Wade will be at the Fleming Museum of Art in Burlington, Vermont, for the Painted Word Poetry Series on Thursday, November 29, at 6:00 pm.

As part of the UNH Writers Series, Kim Adrian, author of the memoir The Twenty-Seventh Letter of the Alphabet, will be reading at the University of New Hampshire, in Durham, New Hampshire, on Thursday, November 29, at 5:00 pm.

Visit our calendar for detailed information about these events and more!

 

Worth a Drive

Edward Carey visits The Odyssey Bookshop in Hadley, Massachusetts, on Thursday, November 8, at 7:00 pm to read from his new novel, Little, about Madam Tussaud. The event is free but registration is requested.

 

Worth a Listen

We're Looking Forward to These November Releases

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Calls For Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

The AVA Gallery in Lebanon, New Hampshire is looking for its next batch of true-life storytellers for its December 13 Mudroom event. The theme is “Holiday Disasters.” Storytellers of all ages and from all towns in the Upper Valley and beyond are welcome to submit their stories for consideration by November 23. In your submission, include a brief summary of the story (no more than 300 words) and a short bio (no more than 150 words). For more information and to submit your story, please visit the AVA Gallery’s Mudroom page.

Marble House Project is a multi-disciplinary artist residency program in Dorset, Vermont, that fosters collaboration and the exchange of ideas by providing an environment for artists across disciplines to live and work side by side. The three-week Artist Residency is open to artists in all creative fields, including but not limited to visual arts, writing, choreography, music composition and performance. Applications for 2019 residencies are open through December 16. The application fee is $32. For more information, please visit the Residency Applications page.

Bloodroot Literary Magazine is accepting submissions of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction for their 2019 Digital Edition through December 31. Submission guidelines are available on the Bloodroot website.

The Frost Place is accepting submissions for their annual Chapbook Competition. The competition is open to any poet writing in English. The submission fee is $28. Submissions will be accepted through January 5, 2019. For more information, please visit the Chapbook Competition page.

Applications are now open for the Dartmouth Poet in Residence program at The Frost Place. This is a six-to-eight-week residency in poet Robert Frost’s former farmhouse in Franconia, New Hampshire. The residency begins July 1 and ends August 15, and includes an award of $1,000 from The Frost Place and an award of $1,000 from Dartmouth College. The recipient will have an opportunity to give a series of public readings across the region, including at Dartmouth College and The Frost Place. Applications will be accepted through January 5, 2019. For more information, please visit the Residency page.  

Every summer, the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, New Hampshire, awards residency Fellowships to artists in seven disciplines, including literature. A Fellowship consists of exclusive use of a private studio, accommodations and three prepared meals a day for two weeks to two months. The deadline for the 2019 Summer MacDowell Literature Fellowship is January 15, 2019. The application fee is $30. For more information, please visit the Residency Application page.


Upcoming Workshops and Classes

Do you have an interview project in mind but don’t quite know where to begin or how to proceed? The Vermont Folklife Center is offering an “Oral History: An Introduction” workshop that can help you move your project forward. The workshop will be held on November 3, from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm at the Dorset Historical Society in Dorset, Vermont. Tuition is $95-$50. For more information and to register, please visit the Vermont Folklife Center Workshop page.

The pressure’s on if you’re participating in National Novel Writing Month, the creative writing project that challenges participants to write a 50,000 word manuscript in November. Take some of that pressure off with the free “NaNoWriMo Expressive Writing” workshop, lead by Joni B. Cole on November 5, at the Norwich Public Library in Norwich, Vermont, from 6:30 to 8:00 pm. This workshop invites you to write from a prompt to develop a character….add a plot twist…or discover a scene that’s just been waiting to burst onto the page. For more information, please visit the Writer’s Center of WRJ Workshops page.

Looking for quality instruction, feedback, and inspiration in a beautiful Vermont setting? This half-day retreat on November 10, from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm, offers all that and more. You’ll have the opportunity to share pages of a new or revised work for personalized feedback, learn tips and techniques to get started and stay motivated, and reap the benefits of gathering within a supportive creative community. Both nervous beginners and seasoned authors are welcome. Tuition is $115 and must be paid in full prior to the retreat. For more information, or to register (required), please visit the Writer’s Center of WRJ Workshops page.

NaNoWriMo too easy? Become a Centurion by earning 100 poetry, essay, or short-story rejections in twelve months. Lead by R. W. W. Greene, this two-hour workshop hosted by the New Hampshire Writers’ Project will “take you through the steps of submitting your work, the mystery of rejectomancy, and the best methods of recuperation from a ‘thanks but no thanks.’” The workshop will be held on November 17, from 1:00 to 3:00 pm, at The Ford House on the campus of SNHU in Manchester, New Hampshire. $50 for NHWP members; $75 for non-members. For more information, please visit the NHWP Workshops page.

Storytelling is a powerful tool for the documentation of voices, memories, and histories. It can also be a catalyst for activism and social change. In this “Storytelling for Social Change” workshop—held on December 1, from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm at the Saint Albans Museum in Saint Albans, Vermont—we will explore the ethics and techniques of oral history, ethnography, and storytelling as activist research methodologies. Attendees will be invited to take a critical and analytical look at the history of documentary work, and will learn the basics of skills such as interviewing, story circle facilitation, and ethnographic observation. We will also cover the technical aspects of storytelling, providing an introduction to tools for minimal-resource and mobile audio recording. Tuition is $95-$50. For more information or to register, please visit the Vermont Folklife Center Workshop page.

The Dipper - October 2017

"The Dipper" is our monthly newsletter, where we highlight readings, events, calls for submission, and other literary-related news for the coming month. If you have news or events to share, let us know

 

October News

Maybe this newsletter is arriving in your inbox on an otherwise quiet Sunday at the beginning of Autumn. Maybe you have plans to go apple picking, or maybe the garden needs putting to bed, or maybe you have a notion to go for a hike and then relax with a new book. Those are all really good ideas. But if you happen to find yourself at a loss for something to do, we suggest the Free Verse Festival, happening today (October 1) at Free Verse Farm in Chelsea, Vermont.

What's in it for you? Here's what: Poetry readings by Major Jackson, Taylor Mardis Katz, Didi Jackson, Hal Coughlin, Julia Shipley, and Megan Buchanan. Plus live music, wood-fired pizza, tacos, artwork, beer, tea, and coffee. And we'll be there, checking folks in and handing out Summer Reads postcards to help you fill up your autumn TBR. Stop by and say hello!

~~~~~

You may wonder how we get so many great events on our calendar. The truth is, we keep our ears open, talk to a lot of people, and spend a lot of hours scanning through online event calendars for venues far and wide to find readings and events we're excited to share with you.

More and more, kind people are contacting us directly to tell us about events they're participating in or organizing. But we know we're still not capturing all the great events this literary community is putting on. If you know of an event, a series, a conference, a workshop, or a venue in Vermont or New Hampshire that we're missing, please drop us a line. We want to make this the best literary calendar you've ever seen.


October Highlights

The Talk of the Porch hosted by Julia Shipley and Stark Biddle will be taking place the first two Mondays in October, November, and December. Join these local writers at the Craftsbury Commons Library in Craftsbury, Vermont, at 7:00 pm to discuss current and classic short stories from The New Yorker. All are welcome. For more information or to find out the reading schedule, call (802) 586-9683.

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Alice McDermott will be reading from her critically acclaimed new novel, The Ninth Hour, at the University of New Hampshire-Durham on Tuesday, October 3 at 5:00 pm.

The Burlington Book Festival Celebrity Series presents Saudi Arabian novelist, Mohammed Hasan Alwan—winner of the 2017 International Prize for Arabic Fiction and the 2015 Prix de la Littérature Arabe—for a reading at Echo Revision Lakeside Pavilion in Burlington, Vermont, on Friday, October 6 at 7:00 pm. The reading will be followed by conversation, book signing, and a reception. This event is free, but seats are limited. To reserve a seat, RSVP at sevendaystickets.com.

Brattleboro Literary Festival is taking place October 13 to 15 at various locations in downtown Brattleboro, Vermont. We are particularly excited to see Hannah Tinti, John Freeman, Nicole Sealey, Carolyn Forché, Min Jin Lee, Carmen Maria Machado, Major Jackson, Claire Messud, and David Tomas Martinez.

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Hisham Matar will be reading at Middlebury College on Thursday, October 19 at 4:30 pm. His book, The Return, was Shari's favorite non-fiction read of 2016.

Also on Thurday, October, 19, Kaitlyn Greenidge will be at the Sanborn Library at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, at 4:30 pm. We both enjoyed Kaitlyn's reading as part of Phoenix Books - Misty Valley's New Voices reading in January.

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Jacqueline Woodson will be at Burlington High School for a talk and signing on Monday, October 23 at 6:00 pm.

Kaveh Akbar will be at Bennington College on Wednesday, October 25 at 7:00 pm to read from his just-released book of poetry, Calling A Wolf A Wolf. Note: If you don't follow Kaveh on Twitter (@KavehAkbar), you are missing out! 

Please visit our calendar for detailed information about each event and to see more event listings for October and beyond.

 

Worth a Drive

Boston Book Festival

The Boston Book Festival is on Saturday, October 28, at Copley Square in Boston, Massachusetts. This year's festival features over 30 authors—writing in genres from fiction to memoir to YA to poetry—as well as several special events. The event is free and open to the public. The full schedule will be available on the BFF website in early October. 

At Mass MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts, the Mastheads' five writing studios, designed by architects Tessa Kelly and Chris Parkinson, spatially interpret the Berkshire work and homes of American Renaissance writers Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. The studios are available for three-hour appointments during the week, and are open to the public on weekends, through October 30.

We're Looking Forward to These October Releases


Calls for Submission and Upcoming Deadlines

The editors of the anthology Birchsong: Poetry Centered in Vermont, vol. I (2012) are pleased to announce the forthcoming publication of a second volume in the spring of 2018. Poets living in Vermont and neighboring states (New Hampshire, New York, and Massachusetts) are invited to submit, by regular mail, one to three poems for consideration through October 31, 2017. Poems, no longer than 70 lines each, must be written since Tropical Storm Irene in August 2011, and sent to Editors, The Blueline Press, PO Box 706, East Dorset, Vermont 05253. Please email thebluelinepressvt16@gmail.com for complete submission guidelines or if you have questions.

The Frost Place is accepting submissions for its 2018 Chapbook Competition. The submission period is October 1, 2017 to January 5, 2018. The competition is open to any poet writing in English. Entries must be accompanied by at $28 entry fee. For details about submitting your manuscript and more information about the competition, please visit the Competition page.

Also from October 1, 2017 to January 5, 2018, The Frost Place is accepting applications for the Dartmouth Poet in Residence program, a six-to-eight-week residency in Robert Frost's former farmhouse. The residency is July 1 to August 15, and includes an award of $1,000 from The Frost Place and $1,000 from Dartmouth College. For more information and to apply online, please visit the Residency page.

Alice James Books is accepting submissions of poetry manuscripts to the Alice James Award, postmarked through November 1, 2017. The Alice James Award welcomes submissions from emerging as well as established poets who reside in the United States. The entry fee is $30. For submission guidelines and more information, please visit the Alice James Award page.

It's a bit out of our immediate region, but Provincetown is only a few hours' drive. If that's no barrier to you and you can commit to living full-time in Provincetown, Massachusetts, for seven months, and you have not yet published a full-length work, you can apply for a Writing Fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center. Applications are being accepted now through December 1, 2017. For details, please visit the Writing Fellowship page.


October Workshops and Classes

Are you interested in typesetting poetry interlined with its translation in a second language and typeface? If so, this Letterpress Intensive Workshop is for you. To join, attend the introductory session on Sunday, October 1, at Baker Library in Hanover, New Hampshire. Attendees can register for the workshop, which will be held on Sunday afternoons through the term. The workshop is limited to six, with priority given to Dartmouth students. For more information, visit the Event page.

Ina Anderson continues her series of poetry workshops on October 18, and November 15 at Seven Stars Art Center, in Sharon, Vermont. The workshops are for beginning through experienced poets, and provide feedback in a friendly, supportive setting. A $10 donation for each session is suggested. Pre-registration is not required. For more information, please see the Event page.

Poet and teacher Sarah Anderson is offering the "Beyond the Ship's Log" workshop on Sunday, October 22. Chronicling a sea voyage has always been part of what happens on board a boat and these written narratives are the basis for much of our understanding of maritime related history. This workshop will equip each participant with tips and techniques for writing about your impressions and thoughts along the way and a framework for transforming those notes into a lasting memoir of your adventure. The workshop will be held at the Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The cost is $130-$145. Space is limited. Register by October 10. For more information and to register, please visit the Workshop & Events page.

Geoffrey Douglas, non-fiction author and adjunct professor of creative writing at the University of Massachusetts, is offering an eight-session workshop in the Upper Valley called "The Well-Told Story," on Tuesdays from 6:00 to 8:00 pm, October 24 through December 12. This workshop will help you address questions regarding how best to tell your story. Do you begin at the beginning and go forward, or at the end and circle back? How do you move your narrative along its round-about path without becoming entangled in it? If your story is a memoir, how personal should you let yourself be? If it’s fiction, how do you develop a cast of characters your reader can believe in?  The cost is $280. For more information or to register, email Geoffrey at geoffreyd@earthlink.net.

Burlington Writers Workshop in Burlington and Montpelier, Vermont, offers an ongoing series of free writing workshops. Upcoming workshops include creative writing (any genre), poetry, and creative nonfiction. For a complete list of upcoming workshops and to register, visit the workshop Meetup page. Workshop leaders in October and November include Julia Shipley and Jensen Beach.